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Perceived discrimination associated with well-being in adults with poor vision

May 30, 2019

Bottom Line: This study of nearly 7,700 men and women 50 or older in England looked at how common perceived discrimination was among those with visual impairment and how that was associated with emotional well-being. Of the individuals, 913 reported poor overall eyesight and 658 reported poor eyesight up close. Discrimination was more commonly reported by those adults with poor eyesight than those with good eyesight, with the most common form of discrimination reported being treated with less respect or courtesy. Individuals who reported poor eyesight and discrimination were more likely to report depressive symptoms and loneliness, as well as lower quality of life and life satisfaction than those with poor eyesight but no reported perceived discrimination. A limitation of the study is that poor eyesight was self-reported. Health care practitioners should consider asking patients with visual impairment about their well-being.

Authors: Sarah E. Jackson, Ph.D., University College London, and coauthors

(doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2019.1230)

Editor's Note: The article includes funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.
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JAMA Ophthalmology

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