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What are the northern lights? (video)

May 31, 2019

WASHINGTON, May 31, 2019 -- Every winter, thousands of tourists head north hoping to catch a glimpse of the luminous auroras dancing in the sky. In this episode of Reactions, we're sharing tips on how to increase your chances of seeing one and breaking down the chemistry behind the colors of this awe-inspiring wonder: https://youtu.be/8S_LPFOa-zs.
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Reactions is a video series produced by the American Chemical Society and PBS Digital Studios. Subscribe to Reactions at http://bit.ly/ACSReactions, and follow us on Twitter @ACSreactions.

The American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society, is a not-for-profit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. ACS is a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related information and research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. ACS does not conduct research, but publishes and publicizes peer-reviewed scientific studies. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

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