Computer science professor awarded $400,000 from National Science Foundation

June 01, 2007

Carola Wenk, assistant professor of computer science at The University of Texas at San Antonio, has been awarded a five-year, $400,000 Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to study geometric shape handling in theory in practice.

The CAREER award is NSF's most prestigious honor for junior faculty members and is designed to support exceptionally promising college and university faculty members who are committed to the integration of research and education. Wenk is the only junior faculty in UTSA's College of Sciences who has a current NSF Career Award.

Wenk, who joined UTSA in 2004, is bridging the gap between theoretical research and applications by integrating theoretical algorithms research with real-world applications such as Global Positioning Systems (GPS), car navigation systems and computational proteomics. Essential in the interdisciplinary field of computational biology, computational proteomics applies the techniques of computer science, applied mathematics, and statistics to the large-scale study of proteins, particularly their structures and functions.

In Greece this past summer, Wenk used data from GPS receivers in school buses and taxis to develop real-time traffic estimation and prediction systems.

"I would like to apply similar technology here in San Antonio and maintain a database for each road segment to determine current travel situations using GPS receivers in cars traveling all over this area," said Wenk.

Additionally, the CAREER award could help create advancements in the medical industry as Wenk and her students look to develop novel computational tools to analyze two-dimensional electrophoresis gels. The gels provide two-dimensional images that can help determine the composition of protein samples benefiting the development of pharmaceutical products.

"This medical imaging technology could help doctors examine a medically processed sample for drops in protein levels and determine whether a certain illness was present," said Wenk.

Wenk received her bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees in math and computer science from Free University of Berlin and completed her post doctoral research at The University of Arizona in Tucson.

Earlier this month, she was the recipient of UTSA's 2007 President's Distinguished Achievement Award for Research Achievement for Tenured and Tenure-Track Faculty.
-end-
The University of Texas at San Antonio is one of the premier institutions of higher education in South Texas and one of the fastest growing universities in the state. One of nine academic universities and six health institutions that comprise the UT System, UTSA is the second largest institution in the system. Celebrating its 37th anniversary, UTSA serves more than 28,300 students enrolled in 63 bachelor's, 43 master's and 20 doctoral degree programs.

Programs are offered through the colleges of Architecture, Business, Education and Human Development, Engineering, Honors, Liberal and Fine Arts, Public Policy, and Sciences, and the Graduate School. A Top 100 Hispanic-serving institution, UTSA is ranked among the top 10. A university of access and excellence, UTSA is committed to research and discovery, teaching and learning, and public service.

University of Texas at San Antonio

Related Gps Articles from Brightsurf:

Using light to reprogramme the brain's GPS
Neuroscientists at UCL have used laser beams to ''switch on'' neurons in mice, providing new insight into the hidden workings of memory and showing how memories underpin the brain's inner GPS system.

GPS isn't just for road trips anymore
Precision agriculture technologies can improve efficiency on smaller farms

Small, precise and affordable gyroscope for navigating without GPS
A small, inexpensive and highly accurate gyroscope, developed at the University of Michigan, could help drones and autonomous cars stay on track without a GPS signal.

Australian GPs widely offering placebos, new study finds
Most Australian GPs have used a placebo in practice at least once, with active placebos (active treatments used primarily to generate positive expectations) more commonly used than inert placebos, according to a new study from University of Sydney.

Practice characteristics and job satisfaction among GPs in 11 countries
Organizational and functional features of general practitioner practices in 11 countries were studied in search of underlying reasons for job dissatisfaction.

GPs need training to tackle chronic opioid use
GPs must be better-equipped to support patients to manage the psychological challenge of reducing their opioid use -- according to new research from the University of East Anglia.

The GPS of neurons now better understood with a study published in Neuron
Researchers demonstrated the role that plays the Boc receptor in the the formation of the nervous system.

New continuity of care tracking method for GPs
New research has outlined a simple way to measure continuity of care for GPs, to benefit patients.

Over 40 percent of GPs intend to quit within five years: New survey
A new survey of GPs has revealed that over 40 percent intend to leave general practice within the next five years, an increase of nearly a third since 2014.

A GPS for inside your body
An MIT team has developed a system that can pinpoint the location of ingestible implants inside the body using low-power wireless signals.

Read More: Gps News and Gps Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.