Innovative surgical practices using tissue-based regenerative therapies may be tightly regulated

June 01, 2016

New Rochelle, NY, June 1, 2016 --The therapeutic use of human cell and tissue products is highly regulated by the U.S. government, but a specific exception allows surgeons to harvest, manipulate, and implant tissues in many commonly performed procedures. While the operating room is often the stage where innovations in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine are realized, as surgeons use grafted tissues, novel biomaterials, and new approaches to perform breast, chest and abdominal wall, and pelvic floor reconstruction, new FDA draft guidelines would place even tighter restrictions on surgical practice and may limit the development of new therapies. This topic is examined in an Editorial in Tissue Engineering, Part A, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free for download on the Tissue Engineering website until July 1, 2016.

In the Editorial "Surgical Therapies and Tissue Regeneration: At the Intersection Between Innovation and Regulation," the Clinical Council of the Editorial Board of Tissue Engineering discuss the United States Code of Federal Regulations as it relates to the use of human cells and tissues and the products derived from them (HCT/Ps). The authors describe the draft FDA regulatory guidance documents and how they would impact companies developing products for regenerative medicine and surgeons performing procedures on patients, including some unintended consequences on the practice of common reconstructive surgical procedures. Specifically they focus on the criteria that distinguish minimally manipulated HCT/Ps that are removed from and returned to the same patient in the operating room, as well as issues surrounding homologous use.
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The authors of the Editorial include J. Peter Rubin, MD, University of Pittsburgh (PA), Geoffrey Gurtner, MD, Stanford University School of Medicine (CA), Wei Liu, MD, PhD, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (China), Keith March, MD, PhD, Indiana University School of Medicine (Indianapolis), Riitta Seppänen-Kaijansinkko, MD, DDS, PhD, University of Helsinki (Finland), Michael Yaszemski, MD, PhD, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine (Rochester, MN), James Yoo, MD, PhD, Wake Forest University School of Medicine (Winston-Salem, NC).

"This important editorial raises critical questions regarding the latitude with which surgeons are able to care for patients in innovative ways," says Co-Editor-in-Chief Peter C. Johnson, MD, Prinicipal, MedSurgPI, LLC and President and CEO, Scintellix, LLC, Raleigh, NC. "Tissue Engineering Clinical Council is taking part in discussions with the FDA to further clarify this emerging regulatory stance."

About the Journal

Tissue Engineering is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal published monthly online and in print in three parts: Part A, the flagship journal published 24 times per year; Part B: Reviews, published bimonthly, and Part C: Methods, published 12 times per year. Led by Co-Editors-In-Chief Antonios Mikos, PhD, Louis Calder Professor at Rice University, Houston, TX, and Peter C. Johnson, MD, Prinicipal, MedSurgPI, LLC and President and CEO, Scintellix, LLC, Raleigh, NC, the Journal brings together scientific and medical experts in the fields of biomedical engineering, material science, molecular and cellular biology, and genetic engineering. Tissue Engineering is the official journal of the Tissue Engineering & Regenerative Medicine International Society (TERMIS). Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed online at the Tissue Engineering website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Stem Cells and Development, Human Gene Therapy, and Advances in Wound Care. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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