Nav: Home

Geographic and health system correlates of interprofessional oral health practice

June 01, 2018

Geographic and health system correlates of interprofessional oral health practice

In the current issue of Family Medicine and Community Health (Volume 6, Number 2, 2018, pp. 77-84(8); DOI: https://doi.org/10.15212/FMCH.2018.0104, researcher Sean G. Boynes, The DentaQuest Institute, Westborough, MA, USA, and coresearchers Abigail Lauer and Amy Martin from Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA examine geographic, system, and organizational constructs that predict medical care teams' willingness to administer fluoride varnish and conduct oral health risk assessments. Caries activity is one of the most common diseases of childhood, and prevention/intervention by primary care teams can positively impact patient results. This analysis examined unknown correlates of oral health prevention and intervention at geographic, organizational, and system levels relating to the impact of referral mechanisms and systems as well as health information technology on fluoride varnish administration and risk-based oral evaluations.

The case for interprofessional oral health care to address the epidemic of early childhood caries has been well litigated. The evidence supports the clinical and cost-effectiveness of primary care-based oral health risk assessments and fluoride varnish applications. Many studies have demonstrated the successful adoption of interprofessional oral health practices at the clinic, system, and state levels. While the personal attributes and opinions of individual physicians and pediatricians have been explored, few studies have examined the organization and system characteristics that enable or facilitate use of fluoride varnish or oral health risk assessments.

Physicians have communicated they are more likely to provide fluoride varnish if they have proper training, have access to patient data to determine eligibility, have access to dentists to whom they can refer patients, and are engaged by leadership in the decision to provide the services. The business case for oral health interprofessional practice was presented in a single state study that demonstrated its cost-efficiency albeit with diminishing returns depending on reimbursement levels.
-end-
FMCH is available on the IngentaConnect platform and at Family Medicine and Community Health. Submissions may be made using ScholarOne Manuscripts. There are no author submission or article processing fees. FMCH is indexed in the ESCI, EBSCO, OCLC, Primo Central (Ex Libris), Scopus, Sherpa Romeo, Ulrichsweb, DOAJ, WPRIM, NISC (National Information Services Corporation) and Index Copernicus Databases. Follow FMCH on Twitter @FMCHJournal; or Facebook.

Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications

Related Community Health Articles:

Debunking common misperceptions of Asian community health
Common misperceptions about Asian health issues contribute to a lack of health awareness and a reluctance to seek care, according to research published in Public Relations Review.
Consensus report shows burnout prevalent in health care community
Clinician burnout is affecting between one-third and one-half of all of US nurses and physicians, and 45 to 60% of medical students and residents, according to a National Academy of Medicine (NAM) report released today.
Research drives acceleration of practice transformation and community health improvement
Early findings from two major federally funded initiatives aimed at accelerating the development and dissemination of health care innovation in the United States were published today as a special supplement to the Annals of Family Medicine.
The Lancet: Big Sugar and neglect by global health community fuel oral health crisis
Oral health has been isolated from traditional healthcare and health policy for too long, despite the major global public health burden of oral diseases, according to a Lancet Series on Oral Health, published today in The Lancet.
Family Medicine and Community Health Journal volume six, issue number four publishes
Family Medicine and Community Health Journal volume six, issue number four publishes.
Efficiency of community health centers in China during 2013-2015
In the current issue of Family Medicine and Community Health (Volume 6, Number 4, 2018; DOI: https://doi.org/10.15212/FMCH.2018.0119, Lin Zhao et al. evaluate of the efficiency of CHCs in China at the national and regional level.
Social stigma contributes to poor mental health in the autistic community
Stress related to social stigma may be the reason why autistic people experience more mental health problems than the general population, dispelling past theories that the condition itself is the origin of such distress.
Family Medicine and Community Health Journal volume 6, issue number three publishes
Family Medicine and Community Health Journal volume 6, issue number three publishes.
LGBT community has poorer health outcomes, assessment finds
The local LGBT community reports twice the number of poor mental health days as the general population of Richmond and Columbia Counties, and those who identified as transgender report twice that, according to a health needs assessment conducted by faculty and students at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University.
Community health centers can help boost rates of colorectal cancer screening
An innovative program in community health centers to mail free colorectal cancer screening tests to patients' homes led to a nearly 4 percentage point increase in CRC screening, compared to clinics without the program, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine.
More Community Health News and Community Health Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Accessing Better Health
Essential health care is a right, not a privilege ... or is it? This hour, TED speakers explore how we can give everyone access to a healthier way of life, despite who you are or where you live. Guests include physician Raj Panjabi, former NYC health commissioner Mary Bassett, researcher Michael Hendryx, and neuroscientist Rachel Wurzman.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#543 Give a Nerd a Gift
Yup, you guessed it... it's Science for the People's annual holiday episode that helps you figure out what sciency books and gifts to get that special nerd on your list. Or maybe you're looking to build up your reading list for the holiday break and a geeky Christmas sweater to wear to an upcoming party. Returning are pop-science power-readers John Dupuis and Joanne Manaster to dish on the best science books they read this past year. And Rachelle Saunders and Bethany Brookshire squee in delight over some truly delightful science-themed non-book objects for those whose bookshelves are already full. Since...
Now Playing: Radiolab

An Announcement from Radiolab