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Exoplanet exploring researchers land at Cornell June 13-14

June 02, 2016

ITHACA, N.Y. - Young researchers in exoplanet science will present research and discuss emerging ideas in the field at the second annual Emerging Researchers in Exoplanet Science Symposium (ERES), to be held at Cornell University June 13-14.  

"It's an opportunity to discuss ideas from an interdisciplinary perspective and rethink what we know about planets in and outside our solar system," says organizer Lisa Kaltenegger, director of Cornell's Carl Sagan Institute and associate professor of astronomy.  

ERES is aimed at early career scientists (graduate students, postdocs, advanced undergraduates) working in all branches of exoplanetary science and related disciplines, such as planetary science, engineering, biology, and related instrumentation and theory. The symposium will give emerging researchers the opportunity to present their research and network with peers, with the goal of enhancing collaborations within the exoplanet community.  

ERES is held annually on a rotating basis between partner institutions. The 2016 meeting is supported by the Carl Sagan Institute.  

The Carl Sagan Institute: Pale Blue Dot and Beyond was founded in 2015 at Cornell University to further the search for habitable planets and moons in and outside our Solar System. Directed by astronomer Lisa Kaltenegger, the Institute has built an entirely new interdisciplinary research group, focused on the characterization of planets and moons - inside and outside the Solar System - and the instruments to search for signs of life in the universe.
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Cornell University

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