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Upgrading the US manufacturing sector

June 03, 2004

Manufacturing has historically been the engine for U.S. economic growth. But the 2001 recession hit manufacturing significantly harder than the rest of the economy, leading to a sharp decline in the nation's employment levels and a drop in use of the manufacturing sector's capacity.

NEW DIRECTIONS IN MANUFACTURING, a summary of a workshop held by the National Academies' National Research Council in March 2003, analyzes measures the government could take to understand and improve the state of the nation's manufacturing sector and includes 19 articles from leaders in the field.

For more information, please visit http://books.nap.edu/catalog/11024.html
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National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

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