New discoveries, new labs highlight international Canadian Light Source meeting

June 04, 2008

SASKATOON, SASKATCHEWAN -Discoveries by some of Canada's brightest researchers will be the focus of the Canadian Light Source (CLS) 11th Annual Users' Meeting. The meeting is part of a joint conference that also includes the fifth International Workshop on Mechanical Engineering Design of Synchrotron Radiation Equipment and Instrumentation (MEDSI) and the 15th Pan-American Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation (SRI) conference in Saskatoon from June 9 to 13 at TCU Place. Experts from over 14 countries will discuss the latest advances in the design and use of synchrotron light sources - one of the most versatile tools available to modern science.

Highlights of recent science and the work of young researchers done at the Canadian Light Source are the centerpieces of the Users' Meeting plenary session on June 9. Presentations cover the range of disciplines touched by synchrotron light, ranging from a drug target for treating tuberculosis and the possible key to improving crop production, to understanding the role soil minerals and bacteria play in the capture and storage of carbon, and the development of new materials for uses in nanotechnology. High school students from Lloydminster Comprehensive High School will report the results of the original experiments they performed at the CLS, trying to identify what makes honey from different flowers so different in colour, texture and flavour. The meeting program can be viewed at: www.lightsource.ca/uac/meeting2008/program.php.

Advances in design and instrumentation made at synchrotrons around the world are the focus of the MEDSI-SRI portion of the conference, June 10 to 13. Presentations will include updates on the CLS and some of the newest synchrotron facilities from around the world, including the U.S.A., the U.K., France, Australia, Brazil, Spain, India and Jordan. Experts will also discuss developments at other facilities, tackling design challenges dealing with patient safety at medical beamlines, cryogenics, new components and state-of-the-art microscopy. A schedule of speakers and topics is available at: www.lightsource.ca/medsi-sri2008/program.php.
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The Canadian Light Source is Canada's national centre for synchrotron research. Located at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon, the CLS is a powerful tool for academic and industrial research in a wide variety of areas including environmental science, natural resources and energy, health and life sciences, and information and communications technology. CLS operations are funded by the Government of Canada, NSERC, NRC, CIHR, the Government of Saskatchewan and the University of Saskatchewan. For more information: www.lightsource.ca/media/quickfacts.php.

Canadian Light Source, Inc.

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