Nav: Home

Designer materials with completely random structures might enable quantum computing

June 04, 2018

Topological randomness may be the answer for lossless electronics and making the nuts and bolts of quantum computers. Complete randomness in the structures of superconductors and insulators could lower the requirements of pristine crystalline ordering - and make them more accessible to industry.

Designing quantum materials with exotic and unprecedented electrical properties has the field of physics teeming with buzz. Researchers at Aalto University in Finland have now introduced a significant turn in this discussion by developing an amorphous material which exhibits topological superconductivity. Until this point, these materials have required highly regular structures to show desired electrical properties.

The findings, published in Nature Communications, bring the field one step closer to application. Topological superconductors and insulators are considered to be possible building blocks of lossless components for quantum computers. While topological superconductors might not exist in nature, they can be fabricated, as the study demonstrates.

'We have presented a method of fabricating topological materials in amorphous systems with randomly placed constituents. This means we can achieve superconductivity in the material by sprinkling magnetic atoms on a superconducting surface completely at random, not in highly-defined and ornamented lattices, for example,' explains doctoral student Kim Pöyhönen.

The recent boom on topological superconductors stems mainly from an unconventional quantum-level phenomenon, a collective movement of many individual particles called Majorana fermion excitations. They have been envisioned as critical ingredients of topological quantum computers.

'Getting highly irregular, random systems to work as topological superconductors will potentially make their fabrication and manufacture much more convenient compared to current methods,' says research group leader, Docent Teemu Ojanen.

Perhaps for now, the implications of the random quantum material verge only on fundamental research, but that might not be the case for much longer.

'For topological quantum matter to find its way to actual applications, it's imperative we find even more new candidates for amorphous topological materials,' states Ojanen.
-end-
Research article:

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-04532-x.pdf

Further information:

Teemu Ojanen, Docent
Theory of Quantum Matter group: http://physics.aalto.fi/en/groups/tqm/
Department of Applied Physics
Aalto University
teemu.ojanen@aalto.fi
tel. 358-40-510-5406

Aalto University

Related Superconductors Articles:

Laser pulses reveal the superconductors of the future
A new study has revealed that the dream of more efficient energy usage can turn into reality.
Enhanced electron doping on iron superconductors discovered
The IBS research team headed by the associate director of CCES, Kim Chang Young, presented the possibility of unifying theories to explain the working mechanism of iron- based superconductors.
New ferromagnetic superconductors AEuFe4As4 (A = Rb, Cs)
The search for ferromagnetic superconductors, in which ferromagnetism coexists with superconductivity below their transition temperatures TFM and TSC (TFM < TSC), can trace back to before 1960s, however, a genuine FMSC that exhibits robust superconducting and ferromagnetic properties is absent to date.
Marrying superconductors, lasers, and Bose-Einstein condensates
As superconductors, lasers, and Bose-Einstein condensates all share a common feature, it has been expected that it should be able to see these features at the same time.
Quantum sensors for high-precision magnetometry of superconductors
Scientists from Basel have developed a new method that has enabled them to image magnetic fields on the nanometer scale at temperatures close to absolute zero for the first time.
Impossible superconductors gone live
The scientists from the Faculty of Physics of the Lomonosov Moscow State University conducted a study evaluating the appearance of the superconducting state in the iron-based superconductors with two energetic gaps.
Special topic: New unconventional superconductors and Weyl semimetal
In the 2016(5) issue, Science China Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy published a special topic on new unconventional superconductors and Weyl semimetal.
Scientists suggest a 100 times faster type of memory cell based on superconductors
Russian scientists have developed a fundamentally new type of memory cell based on superconductors -- this type of memory will be able to work hundreds of times faster than the types of memory devices commonly used today.
Clarifying the role of magnetism in high-temperature superconductors
A collaboration of scientists from the RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Osaka University, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency, and the Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute have published research clarifying the role of magnetism in a new type of high-temperature superconductor.
Physicists explain the unusual behavior of strongly disordered superconductors
Physicists Mikhail Feigel'man (the head of MIPT's theoretical nanophysics laboratory) and Lev Ioffe have explained the unusual effect in a number of promising superconductor materials.

Related Superconductors Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Climate Crisis
There's no greater threat to humanity than climate change. What can we do to stop the worst consequences? This hour, TED speakers explore how we can save our planet and whether we can do it in time. Guests include climate activist Greta Thunberg, chemical engineer Jennifer Wilcox, research scientist Sean Davis, food innovator Bruce Friedrich, and psychologist Per Espen Stoknes.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#527 Honey I CRISPR'd the Kids
This week we're coming to you from Awesome Con in Washington, D.C. There, host Bethany Brookshire led a panel of three amazing guests to talk about the promise and perils of CRISPR, and what happens now that CRISPR babies have (maybe?) been born. Featuring science writer Tina Saey, molecular biologist Anne Simon, and bioethicist Alan Regenberg. A Nobel Prize winner argues banning CRISPR babies won’t work Geneticists push for a 5-year global ban on gene-edited babies A CRISPR spin-off causes unintended typos in DNA News of the first gene-edited babies ignited a firestorm The researcher who created CRISPR twins defends...