Nav: Home

Preschool home visiting program improves academic performance

June 04, 2018

Bottom Line: A program of home visits designed to help families enhance school readiness for their preschool children had by the third grade improved academic performance, eased the social-emotional adjustment to school, and reduced problems at home for the children.

Why The Research Is Interesting: Little research with long follow-up exists on home-visiting programs that are designed for older preschool children (4-5 years old) and emphasize the parenting practices needed to support school readiness skills in children.

Who and When: 200 4-year-old children from low-income families recruited for this randomized clinical trial in 2008-2009 and followed up in 2013-2014

What (Study Interventions and Outcomes): 95 families chosen to receive 10 home visits during preschool, six visits in kindergarten, parent coaching and home-learning materials as part of the Research-Based and Developmentally Informed-Parent home visiting program (intervention); 105 families served as a comparison group and received math home-learning games in the mail (control); assessment of academic performance, social-emotional adjustment and problems at home by the end of third grade (outcomes)

How (Study Design): This was a randomized clinical trial (RCT). RCTs allow for the strongest inferences to be made about the true effect of an intervention. However, not all RCT results can be replicated in real-world settings because patient characteristics or other variables may differ from those that were studied in the RCT.

Authors: Karen L. Bierman, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, University Park, and coauthors

Results: In this randomized clinical trial that included 200 families (n = 200 children), preschool home visiting promoted gains in child academic performance, social-emotional adjustment, and reduced home problems in third grade. Intervention-related improvements in these 3 domains mediated significant reductions in child need for educational and mental health services.

Study Limitations: Some parents invited to participate in the study declined to do so, likely contributing to a final group of motivated study participants.

Study Conclusions: The results of this study appear to support the value of preschool home visiting programs as a strategy to help close the gap in school readiness and child well-being associated with poverty.
-end-
Related material: An author podcast will be posted on this page.

To Learn More: The full study is available on the For The Media website.

(doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2018.1029)

Editor's Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

JAMA Pediatrics

Related Academic Performance Articles:

Heavy TV and computer use impacts children's academic results
Grade 3 students who watch more than two hours of TV daily or spend more than one hour a day on a computer experience a decline in academic results two years later, a new study has found.
Social networks can support academic success
Social networks have been found to influence academic performance: students tend to perform better with high-performers among their friends, as some people are capable of inspiring others to try harder, according to Sofia Dokuka, Dilara Valeyeva and Maria Yudkevich of the HSE University.
Academic emergency departments are always open to all who need care
''Academic emergency departments never deny emergency care to any person.'' That is the statement put forth in a commentary from the Board of Directors of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine and the Senior Editorial Board of Academic Emergency Medicine journal.
Study busts 9 to 5 model for academic work
An observational study of academic working hours has identified large differences in how researchers around the world manage their work-life balance.
Is overall screen time associated with academic performance in kids, teens?
Screen time overall wasn't associated with the academic performance of children and adolescents in this observational study.
Fighting academic failures
Children from undereducated, low-income families face a greater risk of poor academic performance.
Taking arts classes leads to better academic performance, Mason research shows
A new study from the George Mason University Arts Research Center and published in the journal Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts found a link between arts elective courses in music, dance, visual art and drama, and better grades in middle school.
Academic performance of urban children with asthma worse than peers without asthma
A new study published in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology shows urban children with poorly controlled asthma, particularly those who are ethnic minorities, also suffer academically.
Citations show academic and non-academic researchers 'win' when they collaborate
Findings in new PNAS paper indicate that when academics work with business, government, and/or NGO partners they produce more cited, higher impact research.
Women much less likely to ask questions in academic seminars than men
A new study reveals a stark disparity between male and female participation in departmental seminars which helps to explain the 'leaky pipeline' of female representation in academic careers.
More Academic Performance News and Academic Performance Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Debbie Millman: Designing Our Lives
From prehistoric cave art to today's social media feeds, to design is to be human. This hour, designer Debbie Millman guides us through a world made and remade–and helps us design our own paths.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#574 State of the Heart
This week we focus on heart disease, heart failure, what blood pressure is and why it's bad when it's high. Host Rachelle Saunders talks with physician, clinical researcher, and writer Haider Warraich about his book "State of the Heart: Exploring the History, Science, and Future of Cardiac Disease" and the ails of our hearts.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Insomnia Line
Coronasomnia is a not-so-surprising side-effect of the global pandemic. More and more of us are having trouble falling asleep. We wanted to find a way to get inside that nighttime world, to see why people are awake and what they are thinking about. So what'd Radiolab decide to do?  Open up the phone lines and talk to you. We created an insomnia hotline and on this week's experimental episode, we stayed up all night, taking hundreds of calls, spilling secrets, and at long last, watching the sunrise peek through.   This episode was produced by Lulu Miller with Rachael Cusick, Tracie Hunte, Tobin Low, Sarah Qari, Molly Webster, Pat Walters, Shima Oliaee, and Jonny Moens. Want more Radiolab in your life? Sign up for our newsletter! We share our latest favorites: articles, tv shows, funny Youtube videos, chocolate chip cookie recipes, and more. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.