Nav: Home

Glyphosate in tampons? No indication of residues of any health significance

June 04, 2019

Minimal residues of glyphosate were measured in various hygiene products made of cotton in 2015 and 2016. The BfR assessed these findings at the time and concluded that the measured levels did not pose a health risk to consumers. This risk estimation was made under "worst case conditions", i.e. on the assumption that the substance is absorbed to 100% from the tampons.

The levels of glyphosate and its metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in feminine hygiene products including tampons were also the subject of laboratory tests at other research institutions. These included the French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety (ANSES), the Swiss Food Safety and Veterinary Office (FSVO) and the Swedish Chemicals Agency KEMI, among others. In none of the tampon samples did scientists detect levels of glyphosate or AMPA above the respectively achievable limit of de-tection.

In 2015, the BfR dealt for the first time with the issue of possible glyphosate residues in hygiene articles made of cotton. The reason for this was media reports on the results of a preliminary study conducted by the National University of La Plata (Argentina). The sole information source was a YouTube recording of a presentation by Dr. Damian Marino at a media congress in Argentina. The results could not be verified by the BfR at that time. According to the latest information from the CORRECTIV [1] research centre, there has been no scientific publication of this data up to now. The following examinations arrived at the same result:

In 2016, the Bavarian Health and Food Safety Authority (LGL) provided the BfR with test results on levels of glyphosate and its metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in hygiene articles made of cotton. A total of 25 samples were examined, including five tampon samples. Neither glyphosate nor AMPA could be detected in the tampon samples. The limit of detection for both substances was 10 μg per kg cotton.

In 2016, German TV broadcaster ZDF commissioned the examination of a total of 31 samples of hygiene articles including eight tampon samples [2]. Neither glyphosate nor AMPA were detected in the tampon samples. The limit of detection was 10 μg/kg.

The Swiss Food Safety and Veterinary Office (FSVO) examined a total of 16 samples of fem-inine hygiene products in 2016, including eight tampon samples [3]. Neither glyphosate nor AMPA were detected in any of the samples. The limit of detection was 10 μg/kg.

The French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety (ANSES) examined various feminine hygiene products in 2016, including tampons [4]. No information on the scope of the samples or limits of detection was published in this study. Glyphosate and AMPA were not detected in the tampon samples.

The Swedish Chemicals Agency KEMI examined a total of 35 different feminine hygiene products over the last two years, including ten tampon samples [5]. Neither glyphosate nor AMPA were detected in any of the samples. The limit of detection (reporting limit) was 100 μg/kg.
-end-
More information on the topic of glyphosate at the BfR website A-Z Index on the topic of glyphosate (opinions, press releases, FAQ and more)

https://www.bfr.bund.de/en/a-z_index/glyphosate-193962.html

References

[1]
https://correctiv.org/faktencheck/medizin-und-gesundheit/2019/03/30/keine-belege-fuerbehauptungen-ueber-glyphosat-in-tampons

[2]
https://www.zdf.de/assets/laborbericht-pads-tampons-wattestaebchen-etc-100~original?cb=1478230340979

[3]
https://www.blv.admin.ch/blv/de/home/gebrauchsgegenstaende/hygieneprodukte.html

[4]
https://www.anses.fr/en/system/files/CONSO2016SA0108EN.pdf

[5]
https://www.kemi.se/global/rapporter/2018/report-8-18-survey-of-hazardous-chemical-substances-infeminine-hygiene-products.pdf

About the BfR

The German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) is a scientifically independent insti-tution within the portfolio of the Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture (BMEL) in Germany.

It advises the Federal Government and Federal Laender on questions of food, chemical and product safety. The BfR conducts its own research on topics that are closely linked to its as-sessment tasks.

This text version is a translation of the original German text which is the only legally binding version.

BfR Federal Institute for Risk Assessment

Related Cotton Articles:

Why does your cotton towel get stiff after natural drying?
The remaining 'bound water' on cotton surfaces cross-link single fibers of cotton, causing hardening after natural drying, according to a new study conducted by Kao Corporation and Hokkaido University.
DNA riddle unravelled: How cells access data from 'genetic cotton reels'
With so much genetic information packed in such a tiny space, how cells access DNA when it needs it is something of a mystery.
Long-term analysis shows GM cotton no match for insects in India
In India, Bt cotton is the most widely planted cotton crop by acreage, and it is hugely controversial.
What if mysterious 'cotton candy' planets actually sport rings?
Some of the extremely low-density, 'cotton candy like' exoplanets called super-puffs may actually have rings, according to new research published in The Astronomical Journal by Carnegie's Anthony Piro and Caltech's Shreyas Vissapragada.
Benefits of integrating cover crop with broiler litter in no-till dryland cotton systems
Although most cotton is grown in floodplain soils in the Mississippi Delta region, a large amount of cotton is also grown under no-till systems on upland soils that are vulnerable to erosion and have reduced organic matter.
Implementing no-till and cover crops in Texas cotton systems
Healthy soil leads to productive and sustainable agriculture. Farmers who work with, not against, the soil can improve the resiliency of their land.
First report of cotton blue disease in the United States
Reported from six counties in coastal Alabama in 2017, cotton blue disease affected approximately 25% of the state's cotton crop and caused a 4% yield loss.
Next-generation sequencing used to identify cotton blue disease in the United States
Cotton blue disease, caused by Cotton leafroll dwarf virus (CLRDV), was first reported in 1949 in the Central African Republic and then not again until 2005, when it was reported from Brazil.
Tarnished plant bug management strategies for Mid-Atlantic cotton
Tarnished plant bug is one of the most harmful pests of cotton in the mid-Atlantic states of Virginia and North Carolina.
'Exotic' genes may improve cotton yield and quality
Improving cotton quality can have ramifications for $12B US cotton trade industry.
More Cotton News and Cotton Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans 2.0
More than test scores or good grades–what do kids need for the future? This hour, TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, both during and after this time of crisis. Guests include educators Richard Culatta and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#556 The Power of Friendship
It's 2020 and times are tough. Maybe some of us are learning about social distancing the hard way. Maybe we just are all a little anxious. No matter what, we could probably use a friend. But what is a friend, exactly? And why do we need them so much? This week host Bethany Brookshire speaks with Lydia Denworth, author of the new book "Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond". This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Space
One of the most consistent questions we get at the show is from parents who want to know which episodes are kid-friendly and which aren't. So today, we're releasing a separate feed, Radiolab for Kids. To kick it off, we're rerunning an all-time favorite episode: Space. In the 60's, space exploration was an American obsession. This hour, we chart the path from romance to increasing cynicism. We begin with Ann Druyan, widow of Carl Sagan, with a story about the Voyager expedition, true love, and a golden record that travels through space. And astrophysicist Neil de Grasse Tyson explains the Coepernican Principle, and just how insignificant we are. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.