Nav: Home

Older adults with asthma are happier when they have more say in their care

June 05, 2018

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, IL - (JUNE 5, 2018) - It's clear an increasing number of people want a say in their medical care. A new study shows older people with asthma are among those no longer content to say, "Up to you, Doc" and then wait to be told how to move forward with their care.

The study, published in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, the scientific journal of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) surveyed 189 adults over the age of 55 with asthma. The study used the Autonomy Patient Index, an 11-question survey designed to help physicians understand how much patients like to be involved in their medical care.

"Our study showed that a greater desire for involvement - demonstrated by a higher decision-making score - was associated with a better quality of life," says allergist Keerthi Karamched, MD, ACAAI member and lead author of the study. "We also found that female gender, higher education level and lower depression scores were associated with higher decision-making scores. What we know historically is that increasing patient involvement in asthma care - through use of asthma action plans and education - has shown an improvement in asthma overall."

Of the 189 participants in the study 74 percent were women. The average age was 66, and 43 percent of the participants were diagnosed with asthma after the age of 40. The median education level was college graduate.

"The findings were significant because people with a higher level of independence are likely to empower and involve themselves in medical care, giving themselves a greater sense of overall control," says allergist Alan Baptist, MD, ACAAI member and co-author of the study. "Physicians tend to underestimate the amount of information people want regarding their medical condition. This study emphasizes that appreciating how much patients want to be involved in their care may improve outcomes and create a stronger relationship between patient and allergist."
-end-
To find an allergist near you who can help create a personal plan to deal with your allergies and asthma, use the ACAAI allergist locator.

About ACAAI

The ACAAI is a professional medical organization of more than 6,000 allergists-immunologists and allied health professionals, headquartered in Arlington Heights, Ill. The College fosters a culture of collaboration and congeniality in which its members work together and with others toward the common goals of patient care, education, advocacy and research. ACAAI allergists are board-certified physicians trained to diagnose allergies and asthma, administer immunotherapy, and provide patients with the best treatment outcomes. For more information and to find relief, visit AllergyandAsthmaRelief.org. Join us on Facebook, Pinterest and Twitter.

American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

Related Asthma Articles:

Insomnia prevalent in patients with asthma
A team of researchers from the University of Pittsburgh has found that insomnia is highly prevalent in adults with asthma and is also associated with worse asthma control, depression and anxiety symptoms and other quality of life and health issues.
Test used to diagnose asthma may not be accurate
A new study urges caution in the use of the mannitol challenge test for asthma in non-clinical settings.
Turning off asthma attacks
Working with human immune cells in the laboratory, Johns Hopkins researchers report they have identified a critical cellular 'off' switch for the inflammatory immune response that contributes to lung-constricting asthma attacks.
Access to asthma meds, plus flu vaccines, keep kids with asthma healthy
Kids need flu shots to prevent asthma flares, and medications available in school to keep 86 percent in class, according to two studies being presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting.
Discovery could lead to better asthma treatment
Scientists have made a discovery that could lead to improved treatment for asthma sufferers.
Do asthma and COPD truly exist?
Defining a patient's symptoms using the historical diagnostic labels of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an outdated approach to understanding an individual's condition, according to experts writing in the European Respiratory Journal today.
Asthma in many adolescents is not an allergic disease
New research indicates that asthma in many adolescents is not likely to involve inflammation of the airways and therefore should not be considered an allergic disease.
First classification of severe asthma
Severe asthma can have a devastating effect on sufferers, affecting their ability to work or go to school and to lead normal lives.
Exploring 'clinical conundrum' of asthma-COPD overlap in nonsmokers with chronic asthma
Researchers may be closer to finding the mechanism responsible for loss of lung elastic recoil and airflow limitation in nonsmokers with chronic asthma.
Asthma app helps control asthma: Alerts allergists when sufferers need assistance
New study in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology shows how an app directly connecting an allergist and an asthma sufferer can provide necessary intervention when asthma isn't under control.

Related Asthma Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Jumpstarting Creativity
Our greatest breakthroughs and triumphs have one thing in common: creativity. But how do you ignite it? And how do you rekindle it? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on jumpstarting creativity. Guests include economist Tim Harford, producer Helen Marriage, artificial intelligence researcher Steve Engels, and behavioral scientist Marily Oppezzo.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#524 The Human Network
What does a network of humans look like and how does it work? How does information spread? How do decisions and opinions spread? What gets distorted as it moves through the network and why? This week we dig into the ins and outs of human networks with Matthew Jackson, Professor of Economics at Stanford University and author of the book "The Human Network: How Your Social Position Determines Your Power, Beliefs, and Behaviours".