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Remaining switched on to silicon-based electronics

June 05, 2019

Tokyo, Japan--The difficulty of further increasing the power conversion efficiency of silicon-based components in power electronics seems to indicate that we are reaching the limits of potential advances to this technology. However, a research group headed by The University of Tokyo recently challenged that view by developing a power switching device that surpasses previous performance limits, illustrating that silicon technology can still be further optimized. The researchers developed an improved insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT), which is a type of switch used in power conversion to switch high voltages of around 600 to 6500 V.

To design their IGBT, the team used a scaling approach. Their scaling simulations revealed that downscaling part of an IGBT to a third of its original size could lower its operating voltage from 15 V to just 5 V and substantially decrease its driving power.

"Our IGBT scaling approach was based on a similar concept to that used in traditional microelectronics and indicated that an IGBT with an operating voltage of 5 V should be feasible," says Takuya Saraya. "However, we thought that a driving voltage of 5 V might be too low to surpass the unexpected noise level and ensure reliable operation."

To verify their simulation results, the researchers fabricated their IGBT with a rated voltage of 3300 V in a specialized clean room at The University of Tokyo and then assessed its performance. Notably, the IGBT achieved stable switching at an operating voltage of just 5 V. This represents the first time IGBT switching has been realized at 5 V.

An IGBT that exhibits stable performance at an operating voltage of just 5 V is extremely attractive because the power consumption of the drive circuit is only around 10% of that of a conventional IGBT operating at 15 V. Power conversion efficiency is also improved despite the lowered operation voltage. Such a low operating voltage is also compatible with standard electronics processing, which will aid the integration of the IGBT drive circuits with other electronics.

"IGBTs are important power electronics components," explains Toshiro Hiramoto. "Our miniaturized IGBT could lead to the further development of advanced power electronics that are smaller and have higher power conversion efficiency."

IGBTs are found in electronics ranging from electric trains and vehicles to home stereos and air conditioners. Therefore, the improved IGBT with low driving voltage and high power conversion efficiency shows promise to raise the performance of numerous electronics, helping to mitigate modern society's increasing energy demands.
-end-
The paper "First Demonstration of 3300 V IGBT Switching by 5 V Gate Drive" was presented at the IEEE International Symposium on Power Semiconductor Devices and ICs, May 19-23, 2019, Shanghai, China.

About Institute of Industrial Science (IIS), the University of Tokyo

Institute of Industrial Science (IIS), the University of Tokyo is one of the largest university-attached research institutes in Japan.

More than 120 research laboratories, each headed by a faculty member, comprise IIS, with more than 1,000 members including approximately 300 staff and 700 students actively engaged in education and research. Our activities cover almost all the areas of engineering disciplines. Since its foundation in 1949, IIS has worked to bridge the huge gaps that exist between academic disciplines and real-world applications.

Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo

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