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Nanotechnology treatment shows promise against multiple sclerosis

June 05, 2019

Irvine, Calif., June 5, 2019 -- A nanotechnology treatment derived from bone marrow stem cells has reversed multiple sclerosis symptoms in mice and could eventually be used to help humans, according to a new study led by University of California, Irvine researchers.

"Until now, stem cell therapies for autoimmune and neurodegenerative diseases have produced mixed results in clinical trials, partly because we don't know how the treatments work," said corresponding author Weian Zhao, an associate professor of pharmaceutical sciences and biomedical engineering who is affiliated with the Sue & Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center. "This study helps unravel that mystery and paves the way for testing with human patients."

In past experiments, intravenously injected stem cells - taken from bone marrow and activated with interferon gamma, an immune system protein - often got trapped in filter organs before reaching their target. For this study, published in the journal ACS Nano, researchers avoided that problem by extracting nano-sized particles called exosomes from the stem cells and injecting them into rodents with MS.

Loaded with anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective RNA and protein molecules, the exosomes were able to slip through the blood-spinal cord barrier. In addition to rejuvenating lost motor skills and decreasing nerve damage caused by MS, they normalized the subjects' immune systems, something conventional drugs can't do, said study co-lead author Reza Mohammadi, a UCI doctoral candidate in materials science & engineering.

More experiments are in the pipeline.

"This novel treatment will be tested on humans in early 2020, initially on people with Type 1 diabetes," said co-lead author Milad Riazifar, who worked on the study as a pharmacological sciences doctoral student in Zhao's lab and is currently helping prepare for a City of Hope clinical trial of the method. "If successful, it could pave the way for treating other autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis."

Other UCI researchers involved were Egest J. Pone, Aude I. Segaliny, Laura L. McIntyre, Ashley Hamamoto, Erika N. Calle, Wenbin Liao, Victor Pham, Jayapriya Jayaraman, Jonathan R.T. Lakey and Craig M. Walsh. Support was provided by the National Institutes of Health, a National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke training grant, an Otto W. Shaler Scholarship and France's ARC Foundation for Cancer Research.
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About the University of California, Irvine: Founded in 1965, UCI is the youngest member of the prestigious Association of American Universities. The campus has produced three Nobel laureates and is known for its academic achievement, premier research, innovation and anteater mascot. Led by Chancellor Howard Gillman, UCI has more than 36,000 students and offers 222 degree programs. It's located in one of the world's safest and most economically vibrant communities and is Orange County's second-largest employer, contributing $5 billion annually to the local economy. For more on UCI, visit http://www.uci.edu.

Media access: Radio programs/stations may, for a fee, use an on-campus ISDN line to interview UCI faculty and experts, subject to availability and university approval. For more UCI news, visit news.uci.edu. Additional resources for journalists may be found at communications.uci.edu/for-journalists.

NOTE TO EDITORS: PHOTO AVAILABLE AT https://news.uci.edu/2019/06/05/nanotechnology-treatment-shows-promise-against-multiple-sclerosis/

Contact: Tom Vasich
949-824-6455
tmvasich@uci.edu

University of California - Irvine

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