New technique for engineering living materials and patterns

June 05, 2020

Engineered living materials (ELMs) is a new class of materials that exploit the properties of living organismsA new method for engineering living materials called 'MeniFluidics', made by researchers at the University of Warwick could see a transformation in tissue engineering and bio-art, as well as new ways to research cellular interactions.A bacterial biofilm patterned using MeniFluidics.

Living cells have many properties that non-living materials simply don't. The ability of controlling the emergent behaviours of cells and organising them into arbitrary patterns is a key step forward towards utilizing living materials, for uses such as organs on a chip. This is why new technologies are being developed to obtain such an ability.

Physicists and biologists at the University of Warwick have teamed up to develop a new method for controlling cellular patterns, published in the journal ACS Synthetic Biology, titled 'Pattern engineering of living bacterial colonies using meniscus-driven fluidic channels', their new technique is called MeniFluidics.

Grounded on the physics of meniscus generation, the researchers implemented structures into gel surfaces. Evaporation of water from gel materials lead to formation of open channels which can be used for guiding the direction and speed of cellular expansion.

Dr Vasily Kantsler, from Department of Physics at the University of Warwick comments;

"I believe that our catchy named (Menifluidics) technique will enable new opportunities in biophysical and biomedical research and applications such as antibiotic resistance and biofouling"

Dr Munehiro Asally, from School of Life Science at the University of Warwick adds;

"We hope MeniFluidics will be used widely by biophysics, microbiologists, engineers and also artists! As it is a simple and versatile method."
-end-
NOTES TO EDITORS

High-res images available credit to the University of Warwick at: https://warwick.ac.uk/services/communications/medialibrary/images/june2020/pic_for_release.jpgCaption: A bacterial biofilm patterned using MeniFluidics.

Paper available to view at: https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acssynbio.0c00146

For further information please contact:

Alice Scott
Media Relations Manager - Science
University of Warwick
Tel: +44 (0) 7920 531 221
E-mail: alice.j.scott@warwick.ac.uk

University of Warwick

Related Tissue Engineering Articles from Brightsurf:

Plant tissue engineering improves drought and salinity tolerance
After several years of experimentation, scientists have engineered thale cress, or Arabidopsis thaliana, to behave like a succulent, improving water-use efficiency, salinity tolerance and reducing the effects of drought.

COVID-19 and the role of tissue engineering
Tissue engineering has a unique set of tools and technologies for developing preventive strategies, diagnostics, and treatments that can play an important role during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Biofabrication drives tissue engineering in 2019
In the quest to engineer replacement tissues and organs for improving human health, biofabrication has emerged as a crucial set of technologies that enable the control of precise architecture and organization.

Keratin scaffolds could advance regenerative medicine and tissue engineering for humans
Researchers at Mossakowski Medical Research Center of the Polish Academy of Science have developed a simple method for preparing 3D keratin scaffold models which can be used to study the regeneration of tissue.

Combined tissue engineering provides new hope for spinal disc herniations
A promising new tissue engineering approach may one day improve outcomes for patients who have undergone discectomy -- the primary surgical remedy for spinal disc herniations.

Tissue engineering: The big picture on growing small intestines
CHLA surgeon Dr. Tracy Grikscheit and colleagues describe how stem cell therapies could help babies with severe intestinal issues.

Scientists use molecular tethers, chemical 'light sabers' for tissue engineering
Researchers at the University of Washington unveiled a new strategy to keep proteins intact and functional in synthetic biomaterials for tissue engineering.

UCI engineers aim to pioneer tissue-engineering approach to TMJ disorders
Here's something to chew on: One in four people are impacted by defects of the temporomandibular - or jaw - joint.

Scientists develop a cellulose biosensor material for advanced tissue engineering
I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University teamed up together with Irish colleagues to develop a new imaging approach for tissue engineering.

The use of electrospun scaffolds in musculoskeletal tissue engineering
Rotator Cuff tears affect 15 percent of 60 year olds and carry a significant social and financial burden.

Read More: Tissue Engineering News and Tissue Engineering Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.