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Institute for OneWorld Health to exhibit at BIO

June 06, 2005

WHAT Representatives from the Institute for OneWorld Health, the first nonprofit pharmaceutical company in the U.S., will be available at the BIO 2005 Annual International Convention to discuss how the biotechnology industry can partner in the company's innovative approaches to develop safe, effective and affordable new medicines for people with infectious disease in developing countries.

The company's first drug is on track for submission to the Indian regulatory authority by the end of this year. OneWorld Health's pipeline includes drugs for neglected infectious diseases, including visceral leishmaniasis (VL), Chagas disease, malaria and diarrhea. The company recently announced it received Orphan Drug Designation for paromomycin to treat visceral leishmaniasis (VL) from the two leading regulatory agencies in the world, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products.

More information is available at www.oneworldhealth.org

WHEN June 20-22
Mon. 9:30-5:00, Tues. 10:00-6:30, Wed. 10:00-3:30

WHERE BIO 2005 Annual International Convention, Philadelphia
Booth #564 (in California Section)
-end-
CONTACTS Angie Cecil, The Halo Project, 516-455-7441 (mobile), acecil@thehaloproject.com
Joanne Hasegawa, Institute for OneWorld Health, 415-421-4700 ext. 322, 408-718-6631 (mobile) jhasegawa@oneworldhealth.org

Institute for OneWorld Health

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