SNM presents awards on Capitol Hill

June 06, 2007

WASHINGTON, D.C.--SNM, the world's largest society for molecular imaging and nuclear medicine professionals, honored seven legislators with special recognition awards for their outstanding support of the profession. SNM is holding its 54th Annual Meeting June 2-6 at the Washington Convention Center.

"To continue to move molecular imaging and therapy innovations from the research laboratory to real improvements in patient care, we need the support of Congress," said SNM President Alexander J. McEwan, who presented the awards during a June 5 Capitol Hill reception. "We're extremely appreciative of the support from these legislators and look forward to working with them in the future," he added.

Receiving awards from SNM were SNM's Technologist Section presented awards to the following legislators in recognition of their ongoing dedication to patient care and safety through the Consistency, Accuracy, Responsibility and Excellence in Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy (CARE) Act: About 50 people attended the reception, which provided society members and corporate representatives with the opportunity to meet with congressional representatives and their staff members to discuss issues related to molecular imaging and therapy.
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About SNM--Advancing Molecular Imaging and Therapy

SNM is holding its 54th Annual Meeting June 2-6 at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C. Session topics for the 2007 meeting include brain amyloid imaging, hybrid imaging, molecular imaging in clinical drug development and evaluation, functional brain imaging in epilepsy and dementia, imaging instrumentation, infection imaging, lymphoma and thyroid cancer, cardiac molecular imaging, general nuclear medicine, critical elements of care in radiopharmacy and more.

SNM is an international scientific and professional organization of more than 16,000 members dedicated to promoting the science, technology and practical applications of molecular and nuclear imaging to diagnose, manage and treat diseases in women, men and children. Founded more than 50 years ago, SNM continues to provide essential resources for health care practitioners and patients; publish the most prominent peer-reviewed journal in the field (the Journal of Nuclear Medicine); host the premier annual meeting for medical imaging; sponsor research grants, fellowships and awards; and train physicians, technologists, scientists, physicists, chemists and radiopharmacists in state-of-the-art imaging procedures and advances. SNM members have introduced--and continue to explore--biological and technological innovations in medicine that noninvasively investigate the molecular basis of diseases, benefiting countless generations of patients. SNM is based in Reston, Va.; additional information can be found online at http://www.snm.org.

Society of Nuclear Medicine

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