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Could you fail a drug test by taking CBD? (video)

June 06, 2019

WASHINGTON, June 6, 2019 -- Cannabidiol, or CBD, is a non-psychoactive compound produced by the marijuana plant that seems to be everywhere these days. Maybe you've even been asked if you'd like it added to your morning cup of joe! Interestingly, the chemical structure of CBD is very similar to THC, which is the marijuana-derived compound responsible for getting people high and the one screened for by drug tests. This structural similarity begs the question: Could using CBD make you fail a drug test? In this episode of Reactions, we break down the chemistry behind the possibilities: https://youtu.be/BzmZ_sb5dZk.
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