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Are penguins righties or lefties?

June 06, 2019

Researchers in Punta Tombo, Argentina conducted a study to see whether Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) showed lateralization (handedness) in their behaviors or morphology.

They found no lateralization or mixed results in the population of Magellanic penguins in three individual behaviors: stepping up, swimming, and thermoregulation.

They did find lateralization when penguins fought for dominance with the more aggressive penguin using its left eye and attacking the other penguin's right side in most fights.
-end-


Wildlife Conservation Society

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