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Leopard coral grouper: Overexploited

June 06, 2019

Researchers measured the population stock in Saleh Bay, Indonesia of the commercially valuable leopard coral grouper (Plectropomus leopardus), a species subject to population collapse due to high fishing pressure.

The researchers used yield-per-recruit modeling to evaluate population stock and to estimate a biological reference point finding that the species is in fact over-exploited in Saleh Bay.

To reduce fishing mortality, they recommend limiting the catch size and control on spear gun fishing.
-end-


Wildlife Conservation Society

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