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Understanding Amazonia's mysterious ocelots

June 06, 2019

Researchers conducted a 12-year study from 2010 to 2017 on ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) in the Brazilian Amazon, deploying 899 camera traps at 12 stations to determine habitat preferences, which were largely unknown.

Their findings show that ocelots are ubiquitous and adaptable, and seemingly abundant in protected areas or wherever there are forests populated with suitable prey.

The authors warn, however, that this does do not justify complacency regarding their conservation, as deforestation is destroying their habitat.
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Wildlife Conservation Society

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