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Elasmobranches getting slammed

June 06, 2019

Elasmobranches - sharks, rays, and skates - are at an elevated risk of extinction due to overfishing, and Indonesia is a global hub for commercial fishing for these slow-growing, cartilaginous fishes.

Researchers analyzed four years of catch data from Tanjung Luar - a fishing village specifically targeting sharks - to identify catch abundance and seasonality of vulnerable or endangered species, and found that catch per unit effort (CPUE) of sharks and rays from 2014 to 2017 fluctuated but was not significantly different.

The results suggested that management measures should focus on gear control and fishery closures, which could have significant benefits for the conservation of elasmobranch species, and may help to improve the overall sustainability of the fishery.
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