Nav: Home

Evidence human activities have shaped large-scale ecological patterns

June 07, 2006

A new study published in the Journal of Biogeography provides some of the first evidence that ecological patterns at large spatial scales have been significantly altered within recent human history suggesting a role for human activities as potential drivers.

The role of human activities in shaping ecological patterns at continental and global spatial scales has been understudied. This is due in part to the assumption that these large-scale patterns are generated primarily through non-human processes. A study in a forthcoming issue of the Journal of Biogeography, using data on breeding bird assemblages in North America from 1968 to 2003, finds evidence suggesting that human activities have played a role in shaping large-scale ecological patterns. Dr. Frank La Sorte from New Mexico State University used several novel analytical approaches to examine bird assemblages and their geographic ranges in North America to test for patterns of change over time. His findings suggest that a majority of bird species within these assemblages experienced geographic range expansion and a majority of bird assemblages experienced an increased abundance of common species over the 36 year time period. Overall, the results indicate that common species have become more prevalent across bird assemblages in North America within recent human history and human activities, therefore, cannot be ignored as a possible causal factor when assessing these patterns.
-end-
To view the original article abstract please visit
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1365-2699.2006.01480.x

Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Related Human Activities Articles:

Modern sea-level rise linked to human activities, Rutgers research reaffirms
New research by Rutgers scientists reaffirms that modern sea-level rise is linked to human activities and not to changes in Earth's orbit.
Yellow-legged gull adapts its annual lifecycle to human activities to get food
The yellow-legged gull has a high ability to adapt to human activities and benefit from these as a food resource during all year.
Caribbean coral reef decline began in 1950s and 1960s from local human activities
Now, in a new paper in Science Advances, Cramer has combined fossil data, historical records, and underwater survey data to reconstruct the abundance of staghorn and elkhorn corals over the past 125,000 years.
Climate change and human activities threatens picky penguins
Eating a krill-only diet has made one variety of Antarctic penguin especially susceptible to the impacts of climate change, according to new research involving the University of Saskatchewan (USask) which sheds new light on why some penguins are winners and others losers in their rapidly changing ecosystem.
Did human hunting activities alone drive great auks' extinction?
New insight on the extinction history of a flightless seabird that vanished from the shores of the North Atlantic during the 19th century has been published today in eLife.
Human activities boosted global soil erosion already 4,000 years ago
Soil erosion reduces the productivity of ecosystems, it changes nutrient cycles and it thus directly impacts climate and society.
Fracking activities may contribute to anxiety and depression during pregnancy
A new study led by a researcher at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health identifies a link between proximity to hydraulic fracking activities and mental health issues during pregnancy.
All human endurance activities share a common metabolic ceiling
In one of the first attempts to quantify the limits of human energy expenditure over time, researchers using data on athletes who competed in global endurance events report that human energy expenditure could not be sustained above 2.5 times the rate of metabolism at rest.
Human impact on the activities and social behaviour of urban capuchin monkeys
To better understand how primates adapt to the increasing presence of humans, researchers monitored a group of 17 capuchin monkeys for a year and a half.
Human activities shift dominant tree-fungi pairing in North America
The dominant type of tree-fungi pairing found in North American forests has shifted during the past three decades, in response in human activities such as increased nitrogen deposition and fire suppression, as well as climate change.
More Human Activities News and Human Activities Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: Meditations on Loneliness
Original broadcast date: April 24, 2020. We're a social species now living in isolation. But loneliness was a problem well before this era of social distancing. This hour, TED speakers explore how we can live and make peace with loneliness. Guests on the show include author and illustrator Jonny Sun, psychologist Susan Pinker, architect Grace Kim, and writer Suleika Jaouad.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#565 The Great Wide Indoors
We're all spending a bit more time indoors this summer than we probably figured. But did you ever stop to think about why the places we live and work as designed the way they are? And how they could be designed better? We're talking with Emily Anthes about her new book "The Great Indoors: The Surprising Science of how Buildings Shape our Behavior, Health and Happiness".
Now Playing: Radiolab

The Third. A TED Talk.
Jad gives a TED talk about his life as a journalist and how Radiolab has evolved over the years. Here's how TED described it:How do you end a story? Host of Radiolab Jad Abumrad tells how his search for an answer led him home to the mountains of Tennessee, where he met an unexpected teacher: Dolly Parton.Jad Nicholas Abumrad is a Lebanese-American radio host, composer and producer. He is the founder of the syndicated public radio program Radiolab, which is broadcast on over 600 radio stations nationwide and is downloaded more than 120 million times a year as a podcast. He also created More Perfect, a podcast that tells the stories behind the Supreme Court's most famous decisions. And most recently, Dolly Parton's America, a nine-episode podcast exploring the life and times of the iconic country music star. Abumrad has received three Peabody Awards and was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2011.