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This week from AGU: Offshore wind turbines vulnerable to Category 5 hurricane gusts

June 07, 2017

GeoSpace

Offshore wind turbines vulnerable to Category 5 hurricane gusts

Offshore wind turbines built according to current standards may not be able to withstand the powerful gusts of a Category 5 hurricane, creating potential risk for any such turbines built in hurricane-prone areas, according to a new study in Geophysical Research Letters.

Study sheds new light on future of key Antarctic glacier

The melt rate of West Antarctica's Thwaites Glacier is an important concern, because this glacier alone is currently responsible for about 1 percent of global sea level rise. A new study in Geophysical Research Letters finds that Thwaites' ice loss will continue, but not quite as rapidly as previous studies have estimated.

What caused the most toxic algal bloom ever observed in Monterey Bay?

In late spring 2015, the West Coast of North America experienced one of the most toxic algal blooms on record. A new study in Geophysical Research Letters shows that, at least in Monterey Bay, California, the diatoms in this bloom became particularly toxic because of an unusually low ratio of silicate to nitrate in the waters of the bay.

Eos.org

An Autonomous Boat to Investigate Acidic Crater Lakes

A novel aquatic drone ventured into highly acidic waters to test the feasibility of remotely exploring and surveying hazardous volcanic lakes. Monitoring such lakes for changes in volume and other factors is important, but eruptions can make them too dangerous for human inspection by inflatable boat or raft.

Research Spotlights

Meteorites Mix Moon's Surface at Both Small and Large Scales

A three-dimensional model of material transport suggests that impact cratering can mix lunar soils across distances of more than 100 kilometers, according to a new study in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets.

Can Ocean Tides Be Powerful Indicators of Climate Change?

A new study in Geophysical Research Letters simulates how ocean warming due to climate change will affect the electromagnetic signal emitted by ocean tides over the next century.

The Asian Summer Monsoon Launches Pollutants Around the Globe

A new study in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres provides a comprehensive overview of the effect of the Asian summer monsoon (ASM) on atmospheric composition throughout the life cycle of the ASM anticyclone.

How "Whistling" Plasma Waves Shape Earth's Radiation Belts

The Van Allen radiation belts surrounding Earth shrink and swell due to plasma waves moving through them, an analysis of satellite data suggests, in a new study in Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics.

New Supercomputers Allow Climate Models to Capture Convection

Scientists evaluate the latest version of a fine-scale climate model by simulating a decade of precipitation patterns across Europe, in a new study in Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres.

How Variations in Earth's Orbit Triggered the Ice Ages

Researchers pinpoint how Milankovitch cycles have driven ice growth and influenced the timing of glacial periods, in a new study in Geophysical Research Letters.
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