Nav: Home

Who should be on the $10 and $20 bills? How race, gender, & politics shape public opinion

June 07, 2018

Race, gender, political affiliation, and the prejudices and biases associated with them (racism, sexism, and political ideology) seem to be at the forefront of citizen's minds when it comes to preferences for US currency--specifically, who should be on the $10 and $20 bills. The findings come from research published in the Journal of Applied Social Psychology.

Investigators found that among nationally representative samples of the US population, individuals showed in-group favoritism. For example, those of high-status groups (i.e., Whites, males) sought to maintain the status quo and the dominance of the groups they belonged to. Individuals from lower-status groups (i.e., Blacks, females) and individuals who desired to change the status quo (i.e., Democrats, liberals, less sexist and racist individuals) preferred to have a woman on the $10 bill instead of Hamilton. Similar results were seen when individuals were asked about replacing Andrew Jackson with Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill.

"A bill of money is not just a piece of paper. The person depicted on US currency is either an in-group member that people identify with, or an out-group member that people do not identify with," said lead author Prof. Brad Bushman, of Ohio State University. "It is important to people that the individuals depicted on US currency are representative of their own groups."
-end-


Wiley

Related Political Ideology Articles:

Is personal adversity contributing to political polarization?
Unexpected life events can lead to political polarization, pushing moderates toward the spectrum's extremes, according to a new study co-authored by a University at Buffalo psychologist.
To improve our political climate, change the questions we ask
Our fractured political climate in the United States might be made worse by how we approach difficult problems, researchers say in the journal Science.
Not just funny: Satirical news has serious political effects
Satirical news programs, often dismissed as mere entertainment, have real political effects on the people who watch them, new research suggests.
Moralistic thinking on political left, right not so different
Sacred thinking isn't limited to political conservatives, according to a new report from researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Winnipeg.
Political left, right both inspired by utopian hopes
Studies explore moral convictions associated with same sex marriage, gun control.
How food affects political regimes
Better nutrition can have a lot to do with the transition to democracy: the more protein-rich, high-quality foods appear in a society's diet, the higher the likelihood of democratic reforms.
Adaptation to climate risks: Political affiliation matters
A new study reveals that those who affiliate with the Democratic Party have different views than those who vote Republican on the following issues: the likelihood of floods occurring, adopting protection measures, and expectations of disaster relief from the government.
How effective are personalized political ads on Facebook?
In this election year, political advertising on social networking sites such as Facebook is increasingly making use of personalized ads to target specific social media users.
Boredom can lead to more extreme political views
Boredom may be contributing to a widening of political views among voters, according to a new study by researchers from King's College London and the University of Limerick.
Political lobbying, connections may help airlines profits take off
Government lobbying and political connections may add lift to the air transportation industry's profitability, but they could also cause a crash in talented transportation administrators, according to a Penn State Harrisburg researcher.

Related Political Ideology Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Jumpstarting Creativity
Our greatest breakthroughs and triumphs have one thing in common: creativity. But how do you ignite it? And how do you rekindle it? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on jumpstarting creativity. Guests include economist Tim Harford, producer Helen Marriage, artificial intelligence researcher Steve Engels, and behavioral scientist Marily Oppezzo.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#524 The Human Network
What does a network of humans look like and how does it work? How does information spread? How do decisions and opinions spread? What gets distorted as it moves through the network and why? This week we dig into the ins and outs of human networks with Matthew Jackson, Professor of Economics at Stanford University and author of the book "The Human Network: How Your Social Position Determines Your Power, Beliefs, and Behaviours".