Nav: Home

Malaria: Cooperating antibodies enhance immune response

June 07, 2018

Malaria is one of the most inflicting infectious diseases worldwide. Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg, Germany, and from The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Toronto, Canada, have studied how the human immune system combats malaria infections. In this study, the researchers discovered a previously unnoticed characteristic of antibodies against the malaria parasite: They can cooperate with each other, thus binding even stronger to the pathogens and improving the immune response. The results, now published in Science, are expected to help develop a more effective vaccine against the disease.

Each year, an estimated 200 million people contract malaria and approximately 440,000 people succumb to the infectious disease. Although regarded as a tropical disease, malaria can occur in both tropical and subtropical regions. There are malaria cases in Germany as well, with 500 to 600 patients annually. Most of these cases are travelers returning from malaria-endemic regions in Africa or Asia.

"How severe the course of malaria gets, depends on the body's immune response," explains Hedda Wardemann from the German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ). "Immune cells can destroy the pathogens that have invaded the body after a mosquito bite."

In regions where malaria is widespread, people often exhibit a certain immunity that prevents a severe course of the disease. As a result of repeated exposure to the malaria parasite, their bodies have been able to improve their immune responses to the disease. A vaccine is supposed to provide the same kind of immunity but without having to go through an infection.

"Studying the immune response of people who have been exposed to malaria parasites can provide clues about how we can make a malaria vaccine," explains Jean-Philippe Julien, Scientist from SickKids, with whom Wardemann and her team investigated antibodies against the malaria pathogen. The antibodies were obtained from study participants who have had repeated contact with the parasite in the past.

Antibodies are actors of the immune system. They attach to specific targets on the surface of pathogens so they can block their development and tag them for destruction. For an antibody to prevent infection effectively, its affinity (the strength of its interaction with the pathogen) is pivotal. The immune system specifically multiplies antibodies with high affinity to ensure they are present if the body gets infected with the same pathogen again.

Among the antibodies studied, the DKFZ and the SickKids scientists found a group that displayed a previously unnoticed characteristic that appears to be valuable for the immune system: They interact directly with each other. The antibodies can do so because the target structure where the antibodies attach on the malaria pathogen's surface has a special feature. "The protein contains a short sequence of four motifs that repeats itself many times," explained Wardemann, an immunologist.

An antibody can attach to each of the sequence repeats. Neighbouring antibodies can then interact directly among each other. "This type of cooperation between antibodies has been unknown so far in humans," Julien said. "In an indirect way, it enhances the affinity of the antibodies to the pathogen, explaining why our immune system selects for these antibodies."

The human immune system stores these protective antibodies in order to mount a better response in case of a new infection with the same pathogen. Subsequent diseases may then take a milder course - or be prevented altogether. This mimics the immunization effect from vaccines.

Next, the scientists plan to investigate how their results may be used to improve immunization protection against malaria and bring them one step closer to a malaria vaccine. In addition, they will explore whether these observations can be transferred to other repetitive molecules that are present on other pathogens.
-end-
This work was undertaken, in part, thanks to funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Canada Research Chairs program and the SickKids Foundation, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the German Research Foundation (DFG)

Katharina Imkeller, Stephen W. Scally, Alexandre Bosch, Gemma Pidelaserra Martí, Giulia Costa, Gianna Triller, Rajagopal Murugan, Valerio Renna, Hassan Jumaa, Peter G. Kremsner, B. Kim Lee Sim, Stephen L. Hoffman, Benjamin Mordmüller, Elena Levashina, Jean-Philippe Julien, Hedda Wardemann. Anti-homotypic affinity maturation improves human B cell responses against a repetitive parasite antigen. Science 2018, DOI: 10.1126/science.aar5304.

http://www.dkfz.de/de/presse/pressemitteilungen/2018/bilder/homotypic_interaction.png

Picture Caption: Neighbouring antibodies directed against "repetitive" epitopes of the pathogen can cooperate with one another to enhance the binding affinity (left side).

Note on use of images related to press releases

Use is free of charge. The German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ) permits one-time use in the context of reporting about the topic covered in the press release. Images have to be cited as follows: "Source: Katharina Imkeller/DKFZ". Distribution of images to third parties is not permitted unless prior consent has been obtained from DKFZ's Press Office (phone: ++49-(0)6221 42 2854, E-mail: presse@dkfz.de). Any commercial use is prohibited.

A video illustrates the principle of cooperating antibodies: https://www.dkfz.de/de/presse/pressemitteilungen/2018/download/pfcsp_final01.mp4
Source: Steve Bryson/SickKids

The German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ) with its more than 3,000 employees is the largest biomedical research institute in Germany. At DKFZ, more than 1,000 scientists investigate how cancer develops, identify cancer risk factors and endeavor to find new strategies to prevent people from getting cancer. They develop novel approaches to make tumor diagnosis more precise and treatment of cancer patients more successful. The staff of the Cancer Information Service (KID) offers information about the widespread disease of cancer for patients, their families, and the general public. Jointly with Heidelberg University Hospital, DKFZ has established the National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT) Heidelberg, where promising approaches from cancer research are translated into the clinic. In the German Consortium for Translational Cancer Research (DKTK), one of six German Centers for Health Research, DKFZ maintains translational centers at seven university partnering sites. Combining excellent university hospitals with high-profile research at a Helmholtz Center is an important contribution to improving the chances of cancer patients. DKFZ is a member of the Helmholtz Association of National Research Centers, with ninety percent of its funding coming from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research and the remaining ten percent from the State of Baden-Württemberg.

Contact German Cancer Research Center:

Dr. Sibylle Kohlstädt
Press and Public Relations
German Cancer Research Center
Im Neuenheimer Feld 280
D-69120 Heidelberg
T: +49 6221 42 2843
Email: presse@dkfz.de

Contact SickKids

Jessamine Luck
Communications Specialist, Media Relations
The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids)
416-813-7654 ext. 201436
E-Mail: jessamine.luck@sickkids.ca

German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ)

Related Immune System Articles:

The immune system may explain skepticism towards immigrants
There is a strong correlation between our fear of infection and our skepticism towards immigrants.
New insights on how pathogens escape the immune system
The bacterium Salmonella enterica causes gastroenteritis in humans and is one of the leading causes of food-borne infectious diseases.
Understanding how HIV evades the immune system
Monash University (Australia) and Cardiff University (UK) researchers have come a step further in understanding how the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) evades the immune system.
Carbs during workouts help immune system recovery
Eating carbohydrates during intense exercise helps to minimise exercise-induced immune disturbances and can aid the body's recovery, QUT research has found.
A new model for activation of the immune system
By studying a large protein (the C1 protein) with X-rays and electron microscopy, researchers from Aarhus University in Denmark have established a new model for how an important part of the innate immune system is activated.
Guards of the human immune system unraveled
Dendritic cells represent an important component of the immune system: they recognize and engulf invaders, which subsequently triggers a pathogen-specific immune response.
How our immune system targets TB
Researchers have seen, for the very first time, how the human immune system recognizes tuberculosis (TB).
How a fungus inhibits the immune system of plants
A newly discovered protein from a fungus is able to suppress the innate immune system of plants.
A new view of the immune system
Pathogen epitopes are fragments of bacterial or viral proteins. Nearly a third of all existing human epitopes consist of two different fragments.
TB tricks the body's immune system to allow it to spread
Tuberculosis tricks the immune system into attacking the body's lung tissue so the bacteria are allowed to spread to other people, new research from the University of Southampton suggests.

Related Immune System Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Setbacks
Failure can feel lonely and final. But can we learn from failure, even reframe it, to feel more like a temporary setback? This hour, TED speakers on changing a crushing defeat into a stepping stone. Guests include entrepreneur Leticia Gasca, psychology professor Alison Ledgerwood, astronomer Phil Plait, former professional athlete Charly Haversat, and UPS training manager Jon Bowers.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#524 The Human Network
What does a network of humans look like and how does it work? How does information spread? How do decisions and opinions spread? What gets distorted as it moves through the network and why? This week we dig into the ins and outs of human networks with Matthew Jackson, Professor of Economics at Stanford University and author of the book "The Human Network: How Your Social Position Determines Your Power, Beliefs, and Behaviours".