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This Week from AGU: Water usage, black carbon, and 3 research spotlights

June 08, 2016

GeoSpace

In desert suburb, homes in homeowners' associations use less water, study finds.

A new study in Water Resources Research finds that in some areas, homeowners' associations are good for water conservation.

Antarctic lakes provide glimpse of ancient forest fires, modern human impacts

The perpetually ice-covered lakes in Antarctica's McMurdo Dry Valleys preserve the dissolved remnants of black carbon from thousand-year-old wildfires as well as modern day fossil fuel use, according to a new study in Geophysical Research Letters.

Eos.org

One for all, all for one: A global river research network

Intermittent rivers are an increasing share of the world's river network, but current models don't include them. One research network is gathering knowledge about these rivers from around the world.

Research Spotlights

Curiosity Sends Curious Water Data from Mars The rover's neutron spectroscopy instrument hints at an unexpected trend: The upper soil levels in the layers of Gale Crater's Kimberley formation seem to hold more water-associated hydrogen, according to a new study in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets.

How regional wind patterns will influence climate change

Climate change is expected to cause wet regions to get wetter and dry regions to get drier, but a new study in Geophysical Research Letters suggests the truth is more complicated.

A new view of the plate dynamics behind earthquakes in Ecuador

Scientists get one step closer to an updated seismic hazard map that could help Ecuador prepare for future tremors, according to new research in Tectonics.
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Related Black Carbon Articles:

Black carbon varies, but stubbornly persists, in snow and ice around the world
A new University of Colorado Boulder study comparing dissolved black carbon deposition on ice and snow in ecosystems around the world (including Antarctica, the Arctic, and alpine regions of the Himalayas, Rockies, Andes, and Alps) shows that while concentrations vary widely, significant amounts can persist in both pristine and non-pristine areas of snow.
Super P carbon black for reversible lithium and sodium ion storage
Super P carbon black (SPCB) has been widely used as the conducting additive in lithium/sodium ion batteries.
Not like the other black girls
The presumed sisterhood between young black women in the United States doesn't exist between the different classes.
Why pandas are black and white
A study by the University of California, Davis, and California State University, Long Beach, determined that the giant panda's distinct black-and-white markings have two functions: camouflage and communication.
More black police won't result in fewer police-involved homicides of black citizens
Hiring more black police officers is not a viable strategy for reducing police-involved homicides of black citizens in most cities, according to new Indiana University research that is the first in-depth study of this increasingly urgent public policy question.
Study traces black carbon sources in the Russian Arctic
Transport and residential heating could be responsible for a greater contribution of black carbon in the Russian Arctic compared to gas flaring or power plants, according to new research.
New insights into how black carbon aerosols impact the atmospheric boundary layer
It is widely known that soot particles emitted from South Asia are spread across the northern Indian Ocean during the winter monsoon season.
This Week from AGU: Water usage, black carbon, and 3 research spotlights
This Week from AGU: Water usage, black carbon, and 3 research spotlights
Black students more likely to be identified as gifted if teachers are black
African-American children are three times as likely to be placed in gifted-education programs if they have a black teacher rather than a white teacher, according to research conducted by faculty members at the Indiana University School of Public and Environmental Affairs and Vanderbilt University.
Simulating supermassive black holes
Simulations by Kentaro Nagamine at Osaka University's Department of Earth and Space Science, Isaac Shlosman at the University of Kentucky and co-workers have revealed for the first time exactly how these black holes formed 700 million years after the Big Bang.

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