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This Week from AGU: Water usage, black carbon, and 3 research spotlights

June 08, 2016

GeoSpace

In desert suburb, homes in homeowners' associations use less water, study finds.

A new study in Water Resources Research finds that in some areas, homeowners' associations are good for water conservation.

Antarctic lakes provide glimpse of ancient forest fires, modern human impacts

The perpetually ice-covered lakes in Antarctica's McMurdo Dry Valleys preserve the dissolved remnants of black carbon from thousand-year-old wildfires as well as modern day fossil fuel use, according to a new study in Geophysical Research Letters.

Eos.org

One for all, all for one: A global river research network

Intermittent rivers are an increasing share of the world's river network, but current models don't include them. One research network is gathering knowledge about these rivers from around the world.

Research Spotlights

Curiosity Sends Curious Water Data from Mars The rover's neutron spectroscopy instrument hints at an unexpected trend: The upper soil levels in the layers of Gale Crater's Kimberley formation seem to hold more water-associated hydrogen, according to a new study in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets.

How regional wind patterns will influence climate change

Climate change is expected to cause wet regions to get wetter and dry regions to get drier, but a new study in Geophysical Research Letters suggests the truth is more complicated.

A new view of the plate dynamics behind earthquakes in Ecuador

Scientists get one step closer to an updated seismic hazard map that could help Ecuador prepare for future tremors, according to new research in Tectonics.
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Related Black Carbon Articles:

Taxi drivers face highest levels of black carbon compared to other professional drivers
Professional drivers working in congested cities are exposed to black carbon levels that are on average a third higher than would be experienced at a busy roadside, according to research presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress.
First fully rechargeable carbon dioxide battery with carbon neutrality
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago are the first to show that lithium-carbon dioxide batteries can be designed to operate in a fully rechargeable manner, and they have successfully tested a lithium-carbon dioxide battery prototype running up to 500 consecutive cycles of charge/recharge processes.
New route to carbon-neutral fuels from carbon dioxide discovered by Stanford-DTU team
A new way to convert carbon dioxide into the building block for sustainable liquid fuels was very efficient in tests and did not have the reaction that destroys the conventional device.
How much carbon the land can stomach with more carbon dioxide in the air
Researchers from 28 institutions in nine countries succeeded in quantifying carbon dioxide fertilization for the past five decades, using simulations from 12 terrestrial ecosystem models and observations from seven field carbon dioxide enrichment experiments.
Extreme wildfires threaten to turn boreal forests from carbon sinks to carbon sources
A research team investigated the impact of extreme fires on previously intact carbon stores by studying the soil and vegetation of the boreal forest and how they changed after a record-setting fire season in the Northwest Territories in 2014.
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