Advances in the production of minor ginsenosides using microorganisms and their enzymes

June 08, 2020

Advances in the Production of Minor Ginsenosides Using Microorganisms and Their Enzymes - BIO Integration

https://bio-integration.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/bioi20200007.pdf

Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this review article the author Almando Geraldi from the Universitas Airlangga, Indonesia considers the advances in the production of minor ginsenosides using microorganisms and their enzymes.

In this review, various minor ginsenosides production strategies, namely utilizing microorganisms and recombinant microbial enzymes, for biotransforming major ginsenosides into minor ginsenoside, as well as constructing synthetic minor ginsenosides production pathways in yeast cell factories, are described and discussed. The present challenges and future research direction for producing minor ginsenosides using those approaches are considered.

Minor ginsenodes are of great interest due to their diverse pharmacological activities such as their anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, neuroprotective, immunomodulator, and anti-inflammatory effects. The miniscule amount of minor ginsenosides in ginseng plants has driven the development of their mass production methods. Among the various production methods for minor ginsenosides, the utilization of microorganisms and their enzymes are considered as highly specific, safe, and environmentally friendly.

BIO Integration is fully open access journal which will allow for the rapid dissemination of multidisciplinary views driving the progress of modern medicine.

As part of its mandate to help bring interesting work and knowledge from around the world to a wider audience, BIOI will actively support authors through open access publishing and through waiving author fees in its first years. Also, publication support for authors whose first language is not English will be offered in areas such as manuscript development, English language editing and artwork assistance.
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BIOI is now open for submissions; articles can be submitted online at:

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ISSN 2712-0074

eISSN 2712-0082Keywords: BIO Integration; biotransformation, biosynthesis, β-glucosidase, Ginsenosides, minor ginsenosides

Compuscript Ltd

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