University of Pittsburgh scientists awarded for outstanding cancer research contribution

June 09, 2003

PITTSBURGH, June 9 - Yuan Chang, M.D., and Patrick S. Moore, M.D., M.P.H., have been awarded the Charles S. Mott Prize, bestowed annually by the General Motors Cancer Research Foundation (GMCRF), for the most recent outstanding contribution to the cause or prevention of cancer. The husband-and-wife team is from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine where Dr. Chang is professor of pathology and Dr. Moore is professor of molecular genetics and biochemistry and director of the Molecular Virology Program at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI).

Drs. Chang and Moore will be presented with the $250,000 Mott Prize at a ceremony that concludes GMCRF's Annual Scientific Conference, June 10-11, at the U.S. Department of State in Washington, D.C.

"This award is one of the top annual awards in cancer research internationally as well as one of the most prestigious prizes ever awarded to a University of Pittsburgh faculty member," said Arthur S. Levine, M.D., senior vice chancellor for the Health Sciences and dean, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. "In fact, the honor has been bestowed on only a select number of the world's top scientists, nine of whom have gone on to win Nobel prizes."

Drs. Chang and Moore were honored with the Mott Prize for their discovery of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), which causes Kaposi's sarcoma - the most common malignancy occurring in AIDS patients. KSHV also is linked to other disorders that involve a compromised immune system.

"Few scientists can lay claim to have truly found the cause of a cancer," said Ronald B. Herberman, M.D., director of UPCI and the UPMC Cancer Centers. "Drs. Chang and Moore not only found the long-sought cause for a very common cancer in AIDS patients, but they also used their discovery to open new and exciting areas in cancer research. They are continuing to use innovative molecular biology techniques to understand the basis for KSHV's ability to cause cancer and to unearth new pathogens and undiscovered viruses."

Samuel A. Wells, Jr., M.D., president of the GMCRF, called Drs. Chang and Moore exemplary scientists and worthy recipients of the Mott Prize. "They were chosen through a rigorous process conducted by a panel of prestigious international scientists," he said. "Through this award, General Motors supports some of the world's most gifted scientists who have made highly important discoveries leading to the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cancer."

General Motors established the Cancer Research Foundation in 1978 to recognize the outstanding accomplishments of basic scientists and clinical scientists in cancer research around the world. The Mott Prize, among the most prestigious in the field of medicine, is one of three awards GM announces annually.
-end-
The University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute is the only National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center in western Pennsylvania, serving a population of more than six million. UPCI is a recognized leader in providing innovative cancer prevention, detection, diagnosis and treatment; bio-medical research; compassionate patient care and support; and community outreach services. UPCI investigators are world-renowned for their work in clinical and basic research on cancer.

CONTACT:
Clare Collins
Jocelyn Uhl
PHONE: 412-647-3555
FAX: 412-624-3184
E-MAIL:
CollCX@upmc.edu
UhlJH@upmc.edu

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

Related Cancer Articles from Brightsurf:

New blood cancer treatment works by selectively interfering with cancer cell signalling
University of Alberta scientists have identified the mechanism of action behind a new type of precision cancer drug for blood cancers that is set for human trials, according to research published in Nature Communications.

UCI researchers uncover cancer cell vulnerabilities; may lead to better cancer therapies
A new University of California, Irvine-led study reveals a protein responsible for genetic changes resulting in a variety of cancers, may also be the key to more effective, targeted cancer therapy.

Breast cancer treatment costs highest among young women with metastic cancer
In a fight for their lives, young women, age 18-44, spend double the amount of older women to survive metastatic breast cancer, according to a large statewide study by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Cancer mortality continues steady decline, driven by progress against lung cancer
The cancer death rate declined by 29% from 1991 to 2017, including a 2.2% drop from 2016 to 2017, the largest single-year drop in cancer mortality ever reported.

Stress in cervical cancer patients associated with higher risk of cancer-specific mortality
Psychological stress was associated with a higher risk of cancer-specific mortality in women diagnosed with cervical cancer.

Cancer-sniffing dogs 97% accurate in identifying lung cancer, according to study in JAOA
The next step will be to further fractionate the samples based on chemical and physical properties, presenting them back to the dogs until the specific biomarkers for each cancer are identified.

Moffitt Cancer Center researchers identify one way T cell function may fail in cancer
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have discovered a mechanism by which one type of immune cell, CD8+ T cells, can become dysfunctional, impeding its ability to seek and kill cancer cells.

More cancer survivors, fewer cancer specialists point to challenge in meeting care needs
An aging population, a growing number of cancer survivors, and a projected shortage of cancer care providers will result in a challenge in delivering the care for cancer survivors in the United States if systemic changes are not made.

New cancer vaccine platform a potential tool for efficacious targeted cancer therapy
Researchers at the University of Helsinki have discovered a solution in the form of a cancer vaccine platform for improving the efficacy of oncolytic viruses used in cancer treatment.

American Cancer Society outlines blueprint for cancer control in the 21st century
The American Cancer Society is outlining its vision for cancer control in the decades ahead in a series of articles that forms the basis of a national cancer control plan.

Read More: Cancer News and Cancer Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.