EPA scientists recognized with prestigious honor

June 09, 2008

(Washington, D.C. - June 9, 2008) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) presented 55 prestigious Scientific and Technological Achievement Awards (STAA) to more than 300 scientists in EPA's research centers, laboratories, and program offices. The Awards recognize outstanding scientific and technological achievements that have been peer-reviewed and published by EPA employees.

Some of the research achievements include a forecasting tool for fine-particulate matter in outdoor air designed to improve public awareness; indicators to track environmental-health impacts on vulnerable communities; and assessments of arsenic mobility in contaminated ground water and sediments.

"These award winners exemplify the smart, dedicated, hardworking EPA researchers and engineers who, every day, put their scientific knowledge to work for the American people," said George Gray, assistant administrator for EPA's Office of Research and Development. "I'm proud to acknowledge these STAA winners with one of EPA's highest honors."

Of the 55 awards, five were first-place, 13 were second-place, and 37 were third-place. EPA also presented 45 honorable-mention awards. More than 100 award recipients were non-EPA employees who were part of collaborative teams with EPA employees.

EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) administers and manages the STAA program. EPA established STAA in 1980 to recognize Agency scientists and engineers who publish their work in peer-reviewed literature. STAA is an EPA-wide competition that promotes and recognizes scientific and technological achievements by EPA employees. Each year the EPA Science Advisory Board (SAB), an independent advisory committee, is asked to review EPA's nominated scientific papers and make recommendations to the Administrator for awards.

First Place STAA projects and winners:
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For more information about the EPA 2007 STAA Award recipients: http://es.epa.gov/ncer/staa/
EPA's Office of Research and Development: http://www.epa.gov/ord

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

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