Study shows strong prevalence of insomnia symptoms among female veterans

June 09, 2016

DARIEN, IL - A new study sheds light on the prevalence of insomnia symptoms among female veterans.

Results demonstrate that more than 47 percent of female veterans reported symptoms of insomnia that resulted in functional impairment. Of this sample group, less than one percent had a diagnosis of a sleep disorder based on medical records.

"Results from the analysis provide a clinical decision tree identifying subgroups of women with high and low risk for insomnia symptoms," said lead author Kimberly Babson, PhD, Research Health Science Specialist at the National Center for PTSD -- Dissemination & Training Division, VA Palo Alto Health Care System. "These results can be used by primary care clinicians to identify women that fit within these subgroups for referral, assessment and intervention of insomnia symptoms in order to decrease risk for the psychological, physical, and psycho-social consequences associated with insomnia."

The research abstract was published recently in an online supplement of the journal Sleep and will be presented Sunday, June 12, 2016 and Wednesday, June 15, 2016 in Denver at SLEEP 2016, the 30th Anniversary Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC (APSS).

Data for this study were drawn from a cross-sectional survey among a national, population-based stratified random sample of female veterans using Veterans Health Administration primary care facilities.
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This study was funded by the VA HSR&D SDR 12-196 (awarded to Dr. Rachel Kimerling). Additional funding support was provided by a VA clinical Science Research and Development Career Development Award (IK2 CX0010123; Babson).

Abstract Title: Prevalence and Associated risk Factors of Insomnia among Female Veterans

Abstract ID: 0776

Presentation Date: (Poster) Sunday, June 12, and (Oral) Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Presentation Type: Oral and Poster

Presentation Time: (Poster) 5:00 pm- 7:00 pm and (Oral) 11:35 am to 11:50 pm

SLEEP 2016 is a joint venture of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society. The SLEEP 2016 abstract supplement is available at http://sleepmeeting.org/abstract-supplements. For a copy of the abstract or to arrange an interview with the study author or an AASM spokesperson, please contact AASM Senior Communications Coordinator Amy Pyle at 630-737-9700, ext. 9366, or apyle@aasmnet.org.

About the American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Established in 1975, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) improves sleep health and promotes high quality patient centered care through advocacy, education, strategic research, and practice standards. The AASM has a combined membership of 11,000 accredited member sleep centers and individual members, including physicians, scientists and other health care professionals.

American Academy of Sleep Medicine

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