Nav: Home

Heart monitor implant could save lives in patients with serious immune disease

June 09, 2016

London, United Kingdom, June 9, 2016: The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2016) showed that use of an easy to insert heart monitor in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and no known heart disease enables early detection and treatment of potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmias. The findings support the need to identify SSc patients at risk of heart problems that would benefit from this implanted recorder.

SSc is an autoimmune rheumatic disease affecting multiple organs, including the heart. Damage to the heart as a direct consequence of SSc may involve the conduction system that controls the heartbeat, the heart muscle, heart valves and/or the external lining of the heart. Cardiac involvement is thought to be common in patients with SSc, although there are often no symptoms or signs.

"We know that cardiac involvement in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) is associated with a very poor prognosis, accounting for between 14 and 55% of deaths among patients with SSc," , said Dr Lesley-Anne Bissell of the Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, University of Leeds, United Kingdom. "Early diagnosis and treatment to reduce the risk of complications is therefore essential and crucial for a positive outcome," she added.

This heart monitor (also known as an implantable loop recorder) is a subcutaneous, single-lead, electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring device used to diagnose heart rhythm abnormalities. It is capable of storing ECG data automatically in response to any significant change in heart rhythm, or in response to patient activation when symptoms are experienced. Its use is well established in cardiology practice.

The device, about the size of a pack of chewing gum, is typically inserted through a small cut to lie under the skin in the upper left chest. Electrodes that monitor the heart's electrical activity are on the surface of the device, so there are no wires, and the device is enclosed in a protective case. The procedure is performed under local anaesthetic and takes 15-20 minutes.

In this pilot study, the heart monitor picked up a variety of heart rhythm abnormalities in more than half of the cohort of 19 SSc patients, including supraventricular ectopics, ventricular ectopics, ventricular tachycardia and complete heart block. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance imaging data available for 15 of these SSc patients showed markers of cardiac damage that significantly correlated with these heart rhythm abnormalities.

Abstract Number: OP0037
-end-
NOTES TO EDITORS:

For further information on this study, or to request an interview with the study lead, please do not hesitate to contact the EULAR congress

Press Office in the London Suite at ExCel London during EULAR 2016 or on:

Email:eularpressoffice@cohnwolfe.com

Onsite tel: +44 (0) 7725 915 492 / +44 (0) 7786 171 476

Twitter: @EULAR_Press

Youtube: Eular Pressoffice

About EULAR

The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) is an umbrella organisation which represents scientific societies, health professional associations and organisations for people with Rheumatic Musculoskeletal Diseases (RMD) throughout Europe.

EULAR aims to promote, stimulate and support the research, prevention, and treatment of RMD and the rehabilitation of those it affects.

EULAR underlines the importance of combating rheumatic diseases not only by medical means, but also through a wider context of care for rheumatic patients and a thorough understanding of their social and other needs. EULAR is supported in this mission by its 45 scientific member societies, 36 PARE (People with Arthritis/Rheumatism in Europe) organisations, 22 HPR (Health Professionals in Rheumatology) associations and 23 corporate members.

The EULAR Annual European Congress of Rheumatology is the foremost international medical meeting announcing the latest research on rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases. EULAR 2016 is expected to attract over 14,000 delegates from around 120 countries. Most if not all professions working in the vast field of RMD will be represented.

To find out more about the activities of EULAR, visit: http://www.eular.org

References

1. EULAR 2016; London: Abstract OP0037

2. Lambova S. Cardiac manifestations in systemic sclerosis. World Journal of Cardiology. 2014; 6(9):993-1005. doi:10.4330/wjc.v6.i9.993

3. Hachulla AL, Launay D, Gaxotte V, de Groote P, Lamblin N, Devos P, et al.Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in systemic sclerosis: a cross-sectional observational study of 52 patients.Ann Rheum Dis 2009; 68: 1878-84

4. Tyndall AJ, Bannert B, Vonk M, et al. Causes and risk factors for death in systemic sclerosis: A study from the EULAR Scleroderma Trials and Research (EUSTAR) database. Ann. Rheum. Dis. 2010; 69(10): 1809-15

5. Elhai M, Meune C, Avouac J, et al. Trends in mortality in patients with systemic sclerosis over 40 years: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies. Rheumatology (Oxford) 2012; 51(6): 1017-26

6. Mittal S. Implantable loop recorder. http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1920236-overview. [Accessed 12 May 2016]

7. http://www.medtronicdiagnostics.com/intl/index.htm [Accessed 12 May 2016]

European League Against Rheumatism

Related Heart Rhythm Articles:

Computer model predicts how drugs affect heart rhythm
UC Davis Health researchers have developed a computer model to screen drugs for unintended cardiac side effects, especially arrhythmia risk.
Certain cancers come with higher risk of serious heart rhythm disorder
People with a history of cancer have an over two-fold risk of developing atrial fibrillation (AFib), the most common heart rhythm disorder, compared to the general population, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC).
Intravenous drugs can often rapidly restore normal heart rhythm without sedation, shocks
A study published in The Lancet found that two ways of quickly restoring normal heart rhythm in patients with acute atrial fibrillation in the emergency department are equally safe and effective.
Bisphenol-a structural analogues may be less likely than BPA to disrupt heart rhythm
Some chemical alternatives to plastic bisphenol-a (BPA), which is still commonly used in medical settings such as operating rooms and intensive care units, may be less disruptive to heart electrical function than BPA, according to a pre-clinical study that explored how the structural analogues bisphenol-s (BPS) and bisphenol-f (BPF) interact with the chemical and electrical functions of heart cells.
Cannabis may be linked to strokes and heart rhythm disturbances in young people
Young people who reported using cannabis frequently had higher risk of having a stroke, according to a Virginia study.
Radiation therapy effective against deadly heart rhythm
A single high dose of radiation aimed at the heart significantly reduces episodes of a potentially deadly rapid heart rhythm, according to results of a phase one/two study at Washington University School of Medicine in St.
Don't miss a beat: Computer simulations may treat most common heart rhythm disorder
Scientists at Johns Hopkins have successfully created personalized digital replicas of the upper chambers of the heart and used them to guide the precise treatment of patients suffering from persistent irregular heartbeats.
Beta blockers reduce stress-induced irregular heart rhythm
Taking beta blockers -- medications that reduce blood pressure and treat many heart conditions -- can blunt the negative effects of stress and anger on people with a history of atrial fibrillation, or irregular heart rhythm, said Yale researchers.
Novel electrocardiogram uses signals from ear and hand to check heart rhythm
A novel electrocardiogram (ECG) method which uses signals from the ear and hand to check heart rhythm is revealed today at EHRA 20191 a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) congress.
Study gives glimpse into how wearable tech may help flag heart rhythm problems
According to preliminary data from the study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session, the Apple Watch was able to detect AFib in a small group of people who had been alerted by the app as having an irregular heartbeat.
More Heart Rhythm News and Heart Rhythm Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Climate Mindset
In the past few months, human beings have come together to fight a global threat. This hour, TED speakers explore how our response can be the catalyst to fight another global crisis: climate change. Guests include political strategist Tom Rivett-Carnac, diplomat Christiana Figueres, climate justice activist Xiye Bastida, and writer, illustrator, and artist Oliver Jeffers.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Speedy Beet
There are few musical moments more well-worn than the first four notes of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. But in this short, we find out that Beethoven might have made a last-ditch effort to keep his music from ever feeling familiar, to keep pushing his listeners to a kind of psychological limit. Big thanks to our Brooklyn Philharmonic musicians: Deborah Buck and Suzy Perelman on violin, Arash Amini on cello, and Ah Ling Neu on viola. And check out The First Four Notes, Matthew Guerrieri's book on Beethoven's Fifth. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.