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Osteoarthritis just as severe as rheumatoid arthritis

June 09, 2016

London, United Kingdom, June 8, 2016: The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2016) showed patients with osteoarthritis (OA) are more likely to have the impact of their condition underestimated by rheumatologists than patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA).

"This discordance between physician and patient perception of disease severity is important because of the negative impact it can have on shared decisions concerning the best choice of therapy," said lead author Dr Isabel Castrejón from the Rush University Medical Centre, Chicago, United States. "This in turn is likely to interfere with treatment compliance and future outcomes," Dr Castrejón explained.

Previous studies have shown that physicians and their patients with various rheumatic conditions, including RA, tend to rate the impact of the disease very differently. , Although recent evidence suggests similar disease burdens in both OA and RA, OA is still generally regarded as being less severe than RA. ,

In this new study, patient perception of disease severity was greater than physician assessment (by two Units or more) in one third of 243 OA patients and one fifth of 216 RA patients. The assessments of severity were equivalent in just over one half of OA and two thirds of RA patients. Physician evaluation of severity was greater than patient assessment (by two Units or more) in 10% of OA and 15% of RA patients. Physician and patient evaluation of disease severity are both based on a 0-10 visual analogue scale; patient assessment included completion of a multidimensional health assessment questionnaire, with scores for physical function, pain and fatigue, a symptom checklist, and a self-reported joint count.

Abstract Number: OP0094
-end-
NOTES TO EDITORS:

For further information on this study, or to request an interview with the study lead, please do not hesitate to contact the EULAR congress Press Office in the London Suite at ExCel London during EULAR 2016 or on: Email: eularpressoffice@cohnwolfe.com

Onsite tel: 44-0-7725-915-492 / 44-0-7786-171-476

Twitter: @EULAR_Press

Youtube: Eular Pressoffice

About EULAR

The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) is an umbrella organisation which represents scientific societies, health professional associations and organisations for people with Rheumatic Musculoskeletal Diseases (RMD) throughout Europe.

EULAR aims to promote, stimulate and support the research, prevention, and treatment of RMD and the rehabilitation of those it affects.

EULAR underlines the importance of combating rheumatic diseases not only by medical means, but also through a wider context of care for rheumatic patients and a thorough understanding of their social and other needs. EULAR is supported in this mission by its 45 scientific member societies, 36 PARE (People with Arthritis/Rheumatism in Europe) organisations, 22 HPR (Health Professionals in Rheumatology) associations and 23 corporate members.

The EULAR Annual European Congress of Rheumatology is the foremost international medical meeting announcing the latest research on rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases. EULAR 2016 is expected to attract over 14,000 delegates from around 120 countries. Most if not all professions working in the vast field of RMD will be represented.

To find out more about the activities of EULAR, visit: http://www.eular.org

References

1. EULAR 2016; London: Abstract OP0094

2. Castrejón I, Yazici Y, Samuels J, et al. Discordance of global estimates by patients and their physicians in usual care of many rheumatic diseases: association with 5 scores on a Multidimensional Health Assessment Questionnaire (MDHAQ) that are not found on the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ). Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2014; 66 (6): 934-42

3. Khan NA, Spencer HJ, Abda E, et al. Determinants of discordance in patients' and physicians' rating of rheumatoid arthritis disease activity. Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2012; 64 (2): 206-14

4. Litwic A, Edwards M, Dennison E, Cooper C. Epidemiology and Burden of Osteoarthritis. British medical bulletin. 2013; 105: 185-199

5. Woolf AD, Pfleger B. Burden of major musculoskeletal conditions Bulletin of the World Health Organization 2003; 81: 646-656

European League Against Rheumatism

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