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Do Hispanics with cancer rely on complementary health practices?

June 09, 2016

New Rochelle, NY, June 9, 2016 -- A study of complementary and integrative health (CIH) use among Hispanic adults with colorectal cancer found that about 40% reported experience with CIH. Women were more likely than men to have used one or more types of CIH, according to the study published in The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available open access on The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine website.

David Black, PhD, MPH, Jane Figueiredo, PhD, and coauthors from the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (Los Angeles), report that more than three quarters of the individuals who used CIH for a specific health condition did not discuss CIH use with their healthcare providers.

In the article "Complementary and Integrative Health Practices Among Hispanics Diagnosed with Colorectal Cancer: Utilization and Communication with Physicians," the researchers describe the types of CIH most commonly used by the patients participating in this study.
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About the Journal

The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine is a monthly peer-reviewed journal published online with open access options and in print. Led by John Weeks, Co-Founder and Director of the Academic Collaborative for Integrative Health, the Journal provides observational, clinical, and scientific reports and commentary intended to help healthcare professionals and scientists evaluate and integrate therapies into patient care protocols and research strategies. Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Alternative and Complementary Therapies, Medical Acupuncture, and Journal of Medicinal Food. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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