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St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientist named Pew-Stewart Scholar

June 09, 2016

Paul A. Northcott, Ph.D., of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital has been named a Pew-Stewart Scholar for Cancer Research, a program that supports young, innovative cancer researchers.

Northcott is an assistant member of the St. Jude Department of Developmental Neurobiology, whose research focuses on medulloblastoma, the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. His projects include using genome sequencing techniques to understand why medulloblastoma recurs. The findings from these studies should aid development of much-needed therapies for patients who relapse.

"This announcement continues a long legacy of support from Pew Charitable Trusts and its partners for St. Jude researchers at different stages of their careers," said James R. Downing, M.D., St. Jude president and chief executive officer. "At St. Jude, we value that support, which helps early career researchers like Dr. Northcott tackle fundamental scientific questions, including unanswered questions in cancer biology, and use those insights to fill gaps in our understanding and treatment of medulloblastoma and other pediatric cancers."

Northcott is one of five new Pew-Stewart Scholars who were selected based on their dedication to pursuing innovative leads to cure cancer. The award includes four years of research funding. The program is a partnership between the Pew Charitable Trusts and the Alexander and Margaret Stewart Trust.

Northcott earned his doctorate at the University of Toronto, where he also completed his first postdoctoral fellowship at the Hospital of Sick Children. He completed a second postdoctoral fellowship at the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg working with Stefan Pfister, M.D. Northcott joined St. Jude in 2015.
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St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

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