Nav: Home

Do policies targeting sugary drinks pay off?

June 09, 2019

Baltimore (June 9, 2019) - Drinks with added sugar, also known as sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), are one of the largest sources of added sugar in the American diet and a major contributor to obesity. SSBs include non-diet sodas, flavored juice drinks, sports drinks, sweetened tea, coffee drinks, energy drinks and electrolyte replacement drinks. Research presented at Nutrition 2019 will examine how various policies could help reduce the consumption of these sugary beverages and improve health.

Nutrition 2019 is being held June 8-11, 2019 at the Baltimore Convention Center. Contact the media team for more information or to obtain a free press pass to attend the meeting.

Should we tax drinks with added sugar?

SSB taxes would decrease obesity-related cancer
A new study estimates that a national 1 cent per ounce of SSB tax could prevent around 17,000 new obesity-associated cancers cases and 10,000 cancer deaths. This modeling study estimates that this tax would save $2.4 billion in lifetime medical costs for 13 types of cancer. The largest health benefits were for endometrial, kidney and liver cancer. Christina Griecci, Tufts University, will present this research on Sunday, June 9, from 12:45 - 1:45 p.m. in the Baltimore Convention Center, Halls A-B (Poster 75) (abstract).

Which type of tax produces the most benefits?
Using a simulation model, researchers found either a tiered or sugar-content taxed structure that placed a higher tax on beverages containing more sugar produced more health gains and cost savings than a tax based on SSB volume. Over 10 years, a tiered tax on SSBs could prevent 460,000 cardiovascular events and 60,000 cases of diabetes and save 28 billion dollars in health care costs. A sugar content tax on SSBs could prevent 370,000 cardiovascular events and 50,000 cases of diabetes and save 21 billion dollars in health care costs while a volume tax on SSBs would prevent 240,000 cardiovascular events and 30,000 cases of diabetes and save 14 billion dollars in health care costs. Yujin Lee, Tufts University, will present this research on Tuesday, June 11, from 8:15 - 8:45 a.m. in the Baltimore Convention Center, Room 314/315 (abstract).

Do health warnings work?

Health warnings can discourage purchases
According to a study involving 400 adults, health warnings on SSBs can discourage the purchase of these drinks. Adults who typically drink sugary beverages were given $10 to spend at a life-size convenience store replica selling SSBs and other products. Study participants randomly assigned to a group in which SSBs in the store displayed health warnings purchased fewer calories from SSBs and were less likely to purchase an SSB than those consumers shown products without the labels. Anna Grummon, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, will present this research on Tuesday, June 11, from 8:30 - 8:45 a.m. in the Baltimore Convention Center, Room 314/315 (abstract).

Health warnings might also reduce obesity
A new simulation study reveals that using health warnings on SSBs across the U.S. could reduce average SSB intake by about 25 calories per day and total calorie intake by about 30 calories per day. These dietary changes could reduce average body mass index by about 0.6 kg/m2 over 5 years--equivalent to losing about 4 pounds for the average adult. The policy was also projected to reduce obesity prevalence by more than 5 million adults over this period. Weight loss would be most pronounced among Black or Hispanic adults as well as those with lower income and educational attainment. Anna Grummon, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, will present this research on Tuesday, June 11, from 8:45 - 9:00 a.m. in the Baltimore Convention Center, Room 314/315 (abstract).

SSBs are often for home consumption
A preliminary analysis found that nearly 80 percent of U.S. households purchase or acquire SSBs in a given week. On average, U.S. households acquire nearly 2000 calories from SSBs per week, with more than 60 percent of SSB calories acquired to bring home for later consumption. The researchers used data from the USDA Food Acquisition and Purchasing Survey, which collected 7 days of data on all foods purchased or obtained for free in a nationally representative sample of 4,826 households during 2012. These findings point to the need for interventions that target SSB consumption at home to reduce overall SSB acquisition. Stephen Onufrak, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, will present this research on Monday, June 10, from 8:30 - 8:45 a.m. in the Baltimore Convention Center, Room 314/315 (abstract).

Additional sugar-sweetened beverages research from Nutrition 2019:
-end-
Image available.

This release may include updated numbers or data that differ from those in the abstract submitted to Nutrition 2019.

Please note that abstracts presented at Nutrition 2019 were evaluated and selected by a committee of experts but have not generally undergone the same peer review process required for publication in a scientific journal. As such, the findings presented should be considered preliminary until a peer-reviewed publication is available.


About Nutrition 2019

Nutrition 2019 is the annual meeting of the American Society for Nutrition held June 8-11, 2019 at the Baltimore Convention Center. It is the national venue for more than 3,600 top researchers, practitioners and other professionals to announce exciting research findings and explore their implications for practice and policy. Scientific symposia address the latest advances in cellular and physiological nutrition and metabolism, clinical and translational nutrition, global and public health, population science, and food science and systems. http://www.nutrition.org/N19 #Nutrition2019

About the American Society for Nutrition (ASN)

ASN is the preeminent professional organization for nutrition research scientists and clinicians around the world. Founded in 1928, the society brings together the top nutrition researchers, medical practitioners, policy makers and industry leaders to advance our knowledge and application of nutrition. ASN publishes four peer-reviewed journals and provides education and professional development opportunities to advance nutrition research, practice and education. http://www.nutrition.org

Find more news briefs and tipsheets at: https://www.eurekalert.org/meetings/nutrition/2019/newsroom/.

American Society for Nutrition

Related Cancer Articles:

Stress in cervical cancer patients associated with higher risk of cancer-specific mortality
Psychological stress was associated with a higher risk of cancer-specific mortality in women diagnosed with cervical cancer.
Cancer-sniffing dogs 97% accurate in identifying lung cancer, according to study in JAOA
The next step will be to further fractionate the samples based on chemical and physical properties, presenting them back to the dogs until the specific biomarkers for each cancer are identified.
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers identify one way T cell function may fail in cancer
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have discovered a mechanism by which one type of immune cell, CD8+ T cells, can become dysfunctional, impeding its ability to seek and kill cancer cells.
More cancer survivors, fewer cancer specialists point to challenge in meeting care needs
An aging population, a growing number of cancer survivors, and a projected shortage of cancer care providers will result in a challenge in delivering the care for cancer survivors in the United States if systemic changes are not made.
New cancer vaccine platform a potential tool for efficacious targeted cancer therapy
Researchers at the University of Helsinki have discovered a solution in the form of a cancer vaccine platform for improving the efficacy of oncolytic viruses used in cancer treatment.
More Cancer News and Cancer Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...