RHM announces publication latest issue: Population, environment & sustainable development

June 10, 2014

London, June 10, 2014 - Papers published in the latest themed issue of Reproductive Health Matters demonstrate the extent of evidence and progressive thinking around population dynamics and sustainability that is informing development policies and programs. The theme of this issue is timely given that meetings and negotiations are currently taking place around the world to decide what will be included in the post-2015 development goals.

The discussions about the post-2015 agenda have focused on calling out to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocates and service providers to form broader coalitions and launch innovative joint projects with sustainable development advocates. Papers in this issue provide examples of such collaborations; including population health and environment (PHE) programs which integrate reproductive health services with conservation, and disaster resilience work.

The editorial of the issue emphasises the need to learn from the history of family planning policy and practice and to be sceptical about what can be achieved through family planning provision alone. Marge Berer, Editor of Reproductive Health Matters states: "Claims are again being made that [family planning] will save the world. [...] Unfortunately, it won't, and everyone needs to study/remember that history so that the same mistakes and the same narrow vision, affecting policy and programmes, are not repeated."

Papers published are written by authors from countries across the globe, such as Brazil, China, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Somaliland, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda; papers address a wide range of topics related to the theme, including:

Neoliberal globalisation, poverty, and universal access to health; development, demography and SRHR, policy implications; fertility, contraception and the one child policy; integrating PHE and SRHR; scaling up conservation programmes; conscientious objection to abortion; a programme to promote female condoms; FGM; anti-homosexuality legislation and more.
-end-
Notes to editors

The issue "Population, environment and sustainable development" of Reproductive Health Matters, Volume 22, Issue 43 (May 2014) published by Elsevier, is now available on ScienceDirect.

Full texts of articles are available to credentialed journalists upon request; contact Lisa Hallgarten at +44 207 267 6567 or lhallgarten@rhmjournal.org.uk Journalists may also contact newsroom@elsevier.com.

About Reproductive Health Matters (RHM)

Reproductive Health Matters is published twice a year, in May and November in English, with editions in translation in Arabic, Chinese, French, Hindi, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. RHM covers laws, policies, research and services that meet women's reproductive health needs. Each issue focuses on a main theme and includes feature papers, topical papers on other subjects and a round-up of information from published literature. http://www.rhmjournal.org.uk

About Elsevier

Elsevier is a world-leading provider of information solutions that enhance the performance of science, health, and technology professionals, empowering them to make better decisions, deliver better care, and sometimes make groundbreaking discoveries that advance the boundaries of knowledge and human progress. Elsevier provides web-based, digital solutions -- among them ScienceDirect, Scopus, Elsevier Research Intelligence and ClinicalKey -- and publishes nearly 2,200 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and over 25,000 book titles, including a number of iconic reference works.

The company is part of Reed Elsevier Group PLC, a world-leading provider of professional information solutions in the Science, Medical, Legal and Risk and Business sectors, which is jointly owned by Reed Elsevier PLC and Reed Elsevier NV. The ticker symbols are REN (Euronext Amsterdam), REL (London Stock Exchange), RUK and ENL (New York Stock Exchange).

Media contact

Lisa Hallgarten
Editorial Office RHM
+44 207 267 6567
lhallgarten@rhmjournal.org.uk

Elsevier

Related Conservation Articles from Brightsurf:

New guide on using drones for conservation
Drones are a powerful tool for conservation - but they should only be used after careful consideration and planning, according to a new report.

Elephant genetics guide conservation
A large-scale study of African elephant genetics in Tanzania reveals the history of elephant populations, how they interact, and what areas may be critical to conserve in order to preserve genetic diversity of the species.

Measuring the true cost of conservation
BU Professor created the first high-resolution map of land value in the United states.

Environmental groups moving beyond conservation
Although non-governmental organizations (NGOs) have become powerful voices in world environmental politics, little is known of the global picture of this sector.

Hunting for the next generation of conservation stewards
Wildlife ecology students become the professionals responsible for managing the biodiversity of natural systems for species conservation.

Conservation research on lynx
Scientists at the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) and the Leibniz Institute for Molecular Pharmacology (Leibniz-FMP) discovered that selected anti-oxidative enzymes, especially the enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD2), may play an important role to maintain the unusual longevity of the corpus luteum in lynxes.

New 'umbrella' species would massively improve conservation
The protection of Australia's threatened species could be improved by a factor of seven, if more efficient 'umbrella' species were prioritised for protection, according to University of Queensland research.

Trashed farmland could be a conservation treasure
Low-productivity agricultural land could be transformed into millions of hectares of conservation reserve across the world, according to University of Queensland-led research.

Bats in attics might be necessary for conservation
Researchers investigate and describe the conservation importance of buildings relative to natural, alternative roosts for little brown bats in Yellowstone National Park.

Applying biodiversity conservation research in practice
One million species are threatened with extinction, many of them already in the coming decades.

Read More: Conservation News and Conservation Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.