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Satellite shows Blanca's remnant moisture over New Mexico today

June 10, 2015

Today, June 10, the remnant moisture from Blanca is now over New Mexico where it is expected to generate some isolated to scattered thunderstorms. An image from NOAA's GOES-West satellite saw clouds associated with those remnants.

The National Weather Service in Albuquerque, New Mexico noted in today's Forecast Discussion, "Moisture associated with the remnants of hurricane Blanca will move over New Mexico today...bringing enhanced chances for rain to the northwest plateau and northern mountains."

A GOES-West satellite image from June 10 at 12:45 UTC (8:45 a.m. EDT) showed clouds associated with the remnant moisture over New Mexico and Colorado. The image was created by NASA/NOAA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

In Albuquerque today, the National Weather Service forecast calls for mostly cloudy skies with isolated showers and thunderstorms, and a high near 88. The chance of precipitation is 20%. Further north in Santa Fe, there's a 40% chance for showers and thunderstorms, mainly before 7 p.m. local time.
-end-


NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

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Satellite shows Blanca's remnant moisture over New Mexico today
Today, June 10, the remnant moisture from Blanca is now over New Mexico where it is expected to generate some isolated to scattered thunderstorms.

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