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Genetic clue to development of mouth ulcers in lupus

June 10, 2016

London, United Kingdom, June 10, 2016: The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2016) showed for the first time an association between a specific genetic pathway and the development of mouth ulcers in patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). Linking the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) genetic pathway with a specific disease characteristic among SLE patients represents an important step towards unravelling the genetic basis of different SLE clinical presentations.

SLE is a genetically complex chronic relapsing autoimmune disease characterised by inflammation that may affect different tissues, including the skin, joint linings, lungs, kidneys and other organs. The disease is highly variable in the way it may present, and also in its outcome among individuals and across different ancestral groups. It often progresses to organ dysfunction and failure.2

"Understanding the relationships between specific SLE risk genes and different manifestations of the disease should help elucidate the underlying disease mechanisms and pathways," said Dr Antonio Julià of the Vall d'Hebron Research Institute, Barcelona, Spain. "Understanding more about the genetic pathways which underlie different manifestations of SLE is an important step towards the goal of improving the management of SLE, and ultimately to offer preventative care to individuals at increased risk of SLE," he added.

To identify new genetic variations associated with different SLE phenotypes, a total of 598,258 different regions on the genome (known as single-nucleotide polymorphisms) were genotyped in a population of 482 Caucasian European SLE patients of Spanish origin recruited from the rheumatology departments of 15 Spanish university hospitals belonging to the IMID Consortium (SLE group). A total of 11 clinically relevant SLE phenotypes were tested for association with over 700 reference genetic pathways. In this discovery stage, two genetic pathways were significantly associated with the presence of mouth ulcers and the presence of antinuclear antibodies in SLE.

These two genetic pathways were then tested for validation in a second independent population of 425 SLE patients of the same southern European ancestry recruited from the same Spanish hospitals. In this replication stage, the significant association between mouth ulcers and the VEGF genetic pathway was confirmed.

"Finally, analysing the transcriptional effect of the topical immunotherapies used for the treatment of mouth ulcers in SLE, we found a significant differential expression of VEGF pathway genes," Dr Julià concluded.

Abstract Number: OP0233
-end-
NOTES TO EDITORS:For further information on this study, or to request an interview with the study lead, please do not hesitate to contact the EULAR congress

Press Office in the London Suite at ExCel London during EULAR 2016 or on:Email: eularpressoffice@cohnwolfe.comOnsite tel: +44 (0) 7725 915 492 / +44 (0) 7786 171 476Twitter: @EULAR_PressYoutube: Eular Pressoffice

About EULARThe European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) is an umbrella organisation which represents scientific societies, health professional associations and organisations for people with Rheumatic Musculoskeletal Diseases (RMD) throughout Europe.

EULAR aims to promote, stimulate and support the research, prevention, and treatment of RMD and the rehabilitation of those it affects.

EULAR underlines the importance of combating rheumatic diseases not only by medical means, but also through a wider context of care for rheumatic patients and a thorough understanding of their social and other needs. EULAR is supported in this mission by its 45 scientific member societies, 36 PARE (People with Arthritis/Rheumatism in Europe) organisations, 22 HPR (Health Professionals in Rheumatology) associations and 23 corporate members.

The EULAR Annual European Congress of Rheumatology is the foremost international medical meeting announcing the latest research on rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases. EULAR 2016 is expected to attract over 14,000 delegates from around 120 countries. Most if not all professions working in the vast field of RMD will be represented.

To find out more about the activities of EULAR, visit: http://www.eular.org

References

1. EULAR 2016; London: Abstract OP02332. Sanchez E, Nadig A, Richardson BC, et al. Phenotypic associations of genetic susceptibility loci in systemic lupus erythematosus. Annals of the rheumatic diseases. 2011; 70(10): 1752-1757. doi:10.1136/ard.2011.1541043. Rullo OJ, Tsao BP. Recent insights into the genetic basis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Annals of the rheumatic diseases. 2013; 72(0 2):ii56-ii61. doi:10.1136/annrheumdis-2012-202351

European League Against Rheumatism

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