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The surgical management of Ebstein anomaly

June 10, 2018

In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume3, Number 1, 2018, pp. pp. 13-20(8); DOI 10.15212/CVIA.2017.0052, Karl M. Reyes, Eric I-Hun Jeng, Susan Cooke, David Hall and Mark S. Bleiweis from the Congenital Heart Center and the Division of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, United States consider the surgical management of Ebstein Anomaly.

Among all congenital heart diseases, Ebstein anomaly is the lesion with the widest spectrum of presentation. It can present from as early as the neonatal period, where immediate intervention is often needed, to the adult period, with no discernable symptoms. It is also one where overall outcome greatly relates to the age at presentation. Generally, presentation in the neonatal period is associated with poorer outcomes, while presentation beyond the neonatal period has excellent outcomes, with low operative mortality. It is thus apparent that understanding every aspect of the anatomy and physiology of Ebstein anomaly and how it manifests itself clinically is paramount to successful treatment. The purpose of the review is to outline the current concepts and strategies in the surgical management of Ebstein anomaly, and to discuss the current expert consensus on how best to tackle this congenital heart disease at different ages of diagnosis.
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