Unique case of cannabis hyperemesis syndrome in palliative care

June 10, 2019

New Rochelle, NY, June 4, 2019--The medical use of cannabis is growing. Medical marijuana may improve symptoms including pain and anorexia. While it may improve nausea and vomiting, it can rarely cause a hyperemesis syndrome with chronic use. Because this is a rare syndrome, case reports are important. A new case study has surprisingly shown that stopping cannabis use may not be necessary to alleviate cannabis hyperemesis syndrome. The case study and a review of the current literature on cannabis hyperemesis syndrome are published in Journal of Palliative Medicine, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. Click here to read the full-text article free on the Journal of Palliative Medicine website through July 4, 2019.

Ileana Howard, MD, University of Washington and VA Puget Sound, Seattle, WA, presents the unique example of a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) receiving palliative care who was able to overcome the effects of nausea and vomiting linked to chronic cannabis use by markedly decreasing, but not discontinuing the use of cannabis. In the article entitled "Cannabis Hyperemesis Syndrome in Palliative Care: A Case Study and Narrative Review," Dr. Howard reported that the patient stopped using inhaled concentrated cannabis extracts, but continued to use oral whole plant-based edible cannabis, which eliminated the cannabis hyperemesis syndrome while sustaining the beneficial effects on other symptoms. This paper and the comprehensive literature review illustrate the challenges in diagnosis, assessment, and management of these patients by clinicians.

Charles F. von Gunten, MD, PhD, Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Palliative Medicine and Vice President, Medical Affairs, Hospice and Palliative Medicine for the OhioHealth system, states: "This case study adds to our clinical ability to respond to rare adverse effects of medical cannabis use. Given the meteoric rise in the medical use of marijuana across the U.S. and around the world, it is essential to disseminate these clinical observations."
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About the Journal

Journal of Palliative Medicine, the official journal of the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC), Australian and New Zealand Society of Palliative Medicine (ANZSPM), Canadian Society of Palliative Care Physicians (CSPCP), Asia Pacific Hospice Palliative Care Network (APHN), and an official journal Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association (HPNA), the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC) and the Japanese Society for Palliative Medicine (JSPM), is a global interdisciplinary journal published monthly in print and online that reports on the clinical, educational, legal, and ethical aspects of care for seriously ill and dying patients. The Journal includes coverage of the latest developments in drug and non-drug treatments for patients with life-threatening diseases including cancer, AIDS, cardiac disease, pulmonary, neurological, and respiratory conditions, and other diseases. The Journal reports on the development of palliative care programs around the United States and the world and on innovations in palliative care education. Tables of content and a sample issue can be viewed on the Journal of Palliative Medicine website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Population Health Management, AIDS Patient Care and STDs, and Briefings in Palliative, Hospice, and Pain Medicine & Management, a weekly e-News Alert. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, newsmagazines, and books is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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