Nav: Home

Drug delivery system maintains breathing after spinal cord injury in rats

June 11, 2018

Researchers have devised a safe and effective way to deliver therapeutic molecules to the cervical spinal cord after injury in female rats. Reported in JNeurosci and, this clinically-relevant approach could help to repair the neural connections that control breathing in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients.

Given its proximity to the brain, damage to the cervical spine -- the portion of the spinal cord housed within the neck vertebrae -- is among the most serious SCIs. Cervical spine injury can sever the connection between the central nervous system and the breathing muscle that enables inhalation, paralyzing the diaphragm and causing major respiratory dysfunction in these patients.

Angelo Lepore, Yinghui Zhong, and colleagues developed a gel loaded with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which has previously been shown to have the potential to repair the circuitry that controls the diaphragm. The researchers demonstrate the efficacy of local administration of this drug in an established female rat SCI model and show that the BDNF gel preserves diaphragm function by preserving the motor neurons responsible for the muscle's activation. This new drug delivery system uses materials that are safe for human use while avoiding the side effects associated with existing delivery methods.
-end-
Article: Local BDNF delivery to the injured cervical spinal cord using an engineered hydrogel enhances diaphragmatic respiratory function
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3084-17.2018
Corresponding authors: Angelo Lepore, angelo.lepore@jefferson.edu (Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA) and Yinghui Zhong (Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA), yz348@drexel.edu

About JNeurosci

JNeurosci, the Society for Neuroscience's first journal, was launched in 1981 as a means to communicate the findings of the highest quality neuroscience research to the growing field. Today, the journal remains committed to publishing cutting-edge neuroscience that will have an immediate and lasting scientific impact, while responding to authors' changing publishing needs, representing breadth of the field and diversity in authorship.

About The Society for Neuroscience

The Society for Neuroscience is the world's largest organization of scientists and physicians devoted to understanding the brain and nervous system. The nonprofit organization, founded in 1969, now has nearly 37,000 members in more than 90 countries and over 130 chapters worldwide.

Society for Neuroscience

Related Spinal Cord Injury Articles:

Spinal cord injury patients face many serious health problems besides paralysis
Spinal cord patients are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease; pneumonia; life-threatening blood clots; bladder, bowel and sexual dysfunction; constipation and other gastrointestinal problems; pressure ulcers; and chronic pain, according to a report published in the journal Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports.
A review on the therapeutic antibodies for spinal cord injury
Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes long-lasting damage in the spinal cord that leads to paraparesis, paraplegia, quadriplegia and other lifetime disabilities.
Health behaviors and management critical for spinal cord injury patients
U-M researcher is the co-editor of a two-part series of Topics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation focused on recent research studies about health behaviors and health management in individuals with spinal cord injury.
First clinical guidelines in Canada for pain following spinal cord injury
Researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute are the first in Canada to develop clinical practice guidelines for managing neuropathic pain with patients who have experienced a spinal cord injury.
Improving cell transplantation after spinal cord injury: When, where and how?
Spinal cord injuries are mostly caused by trauma, often incurred in road traffic or sporting incidents, often with devastating and irreversible consequences.
Discovery in roundworms may one day help humans with spinal cord injury and paralysis
A newly discovered pathway leading to the regeneration of central nervous system (CNS) brain cells (neurons) in a type of roundworm (C. elegans) sheds light on the adult human nervous system's ability to regenerate.
Protective effect of genetically modified cord blood on spinal cord injury in rats
Researchers of Kazan Federal University genetically modified cord blood which managed to increase tissue sparing and numbers of regenerated axons, reduce glial scar formation and promote behavioral recovery when transplanted immediately after a rat contusion spinal cord injury.
Aging diminishes spinal cord regeneration after injury
Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and University of British Columbia (UBC) have determined that, in mice, age diminishes ability to regenerate axons, the brain's communication wires in the spinal cord.
Neuroscientific evidence that motivation promotes recovery after spinal cord injury
The research team led by Associate Professor Yukio Nishimura, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Natural Institutes of Natural Sciences, found that the nucleus accumbens, that control motivation in the brain, activates the activity of the motor cortex of the brain, and then promotes recovery of motor function during the early stage of recovery after spinal cord injury.
New approach to spinal cord and brain injury research
Many an injury will heal, but the damaged spinal cord is notoriously recalcitrant.

Related Spinal Cord Injury Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Climate Crisis
There's no greater threat to humanity than climate change. What can we do to stop the worst consequences? This hour, TED speakers explore how we can save our planet and whether we can do it in time. Guests include climate activist Greta Thunberg, chemical engineer Jennifer Wilcox, research scientist Sean Davis, food innovator Bruce Friedrich, and psychologist Per Espen Stoknes.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#527 Honey I CRISPR'd the Kids
This week we're coming to you from Awesome Con in Washington, D.C. There, host Bethany Brookshire led a panel of three amazing guests to talk about the promise and perils of CRISPR, and what happens now that CRISPR babies have (maybe?) been born. Featuring science writer Tina Saey, molecular biologist Anne Simon, and bioethicist Alan Regenberg. A Nobel Prize winner argues banning CRISPR babies won’t work Geneticists push for a 5-year global ban on gene-edited babies A CRISPR spin-off causes unintended typos in DNA News of the first gene-edited babies ignited a firestorm The researcher who created CRISPR twins defends...