Nav: Home

Promising treatment option for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

June 11, 2019

A study, published today in PNAS, has found a potential treatment for patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS).

CRPS is a severe post-traumatic pain condition affecting one or more limbs and is associated with regional pain and sensory, bone and skin changes. The causes of CRPS, however, are yet to be fully understood.

Approximately 15 percent of patients with CRPS still have symptoms one year after onset that severely impact their quality of life. For these patients, prognosis is often poor and drug therapy for pain relief is rarely effective.

A team of international researchers, led by Dr Andreas Goebel from the University of Liverpool's Pain Research Institute, conducted a study to better understand the immunological causes for CRPS.

The researchers examined antibodies in the serum of these patients to ascertain the potential role of these proteins for causing the condition; they were particularly interested to assess 'neuroinflammation' - antibody-induced raised levels of inflammatory mediators such as Interleukin 1 (IL-1) in either peripheral tissues or brain.

IL-1 is known to normally induce local and systemic body-responses aimed to eliminate microorganisms and repair tissue damage. However, an increasing number of clinical conditions have been identified in which IL-1 production is considered inappropriate and IL-1 is part of the cause of the disease.

The researchers transferred the antibodies from patients with long-lasting CRPS to mice and found that these antibodies consistently caused a CRPS-like condition. An important element of 'transferred CRPS' was glial cell activation, a type of 'neuroinflammation' in pain-related parts of the mouse brains. The team then discovered that 'blocking' of IL-1 with a clinically available drug, 'anakinra' helped to both prevent and reverse all of these changes in the animals.

Researchers from the University of Pécs (Hungary), University of Budapest (Hungary), University of Manchester, University of Sheffield and The Walton Centre National Health Service Foundation Trust in Liverpool were also involved in the study.

Dr Andreas Goebel, said: "Our results support previous clinical observations that patients with persistent CRPS should respond to immune treatments with a reduction of at least some of their disease features.

"This approach has attractive therapeutic potential and could also have a real impact on the treatment of other unexplained chronic pain conditions; we plant now to apply for funds funds to test the effect of this and similar drugs in patients with CRPS."
-end-
The full study, entitled 'Transfer of complex regional pain syndrome to mice via human autoantibodies is mediated by interleukin-1-induced mechanisms', can be found here https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2019/06/04/1820168116.short?rss=1

https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1820168116

University of Liverpool

Related Antibodies Articles:

Researchers discover first human antibodies that work against all ebolaviruses
After analyzing the blood of a survivor of the 2013-16 Ebola outbreak, a team of scientists from academia, industry and the government has discovered the first natural human antibodies that can neutralize and protect animals against all three major disease-causing ebolaviruses.
New method enables creation of better therapeutic antibodies
Researchers from the University of Maryland and Rockefeller University have refined a method to modify an antibody's sugar group structure, which plays a large role in determining an antibody's ability to activate the immune response.
Antibodies as 'messengers' in the nervous system
Antibodies are able to activate human nerve cells within milliseconds and hence modify their function -- that is the surprising conclusion of a study carried out at Human Biology at the Technical University of Munich (TUM).
Turning therapeutic antibodies inside-out to fight cancer
Researchers at the University of California, Riverside have camels and llamas to thank for their development of a new cancer treatment that is highly selective in blocking the action of faulty matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs).
Zika antibodies from infected patient thwart infection in mice
Researchers have identified neutralizing antibodies against Zika virus from an infected patient that fully protected mice from infection, adding to the current arsenal of antibodies in development for much needed antiviral therapies and vaccines.
A review on the therapeutic antibodies for spinal cord injury
Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes long-lasting damage in the spinal cord that leads to paraparesis, paraplegia, quadriplegia and other lifetime disabilities.
Training human antibodies to protect against HIV
During HIV infection, the virus mutates too rapidly for the immune system to combat, but some people produce antibodies that can recognize the virus even two years after infection.
How antiviral antibodies become part of immune memory
Emory scientists probe activated B cells, important for forming immune memory, during flu vaccination and infection and Ebola infection in humans.
Mouse antibodies pinpoint Zika's weak spots
Antibodies that specifically protect against Zika infection have been identified in mice, report Washington University School of Medicine in St.
Antibodies identified that thwart Zika virus infection
Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified antibodies capable of protecting against Zika virus infection, a significant step toward developing a vaccine, better diagnostic tests and possibly new antibody-based therapies.

Related Antibodies Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Moving Forward
When the life you've built slips out of your grasp, you're often told it's best to move on. But is that true? Instead of forgetting the past, TED speakers describe how we can move forward with it. Guests include writers Nora McInerny and Suleika Jaouad, and human rights advocate Lindy Lou Isonhood.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#527 Honey I CRISPR'd the Kids
This week we're coming to you from Awesome Con in Washington, D.C. There, host Bethany Brookshire led a panel of three amazing guests to talk about the promise and perils of CRISPR, and what happens now that CRISPR babies have (maybe?) been born. Featuring science writer Tina Saey, molecular biologist Anne Simon, and bioethicist Alan Regenberg. A Nobel Prize winner argues banning CRISPR babies won’t work Geneticists push for a 5-year global ban on gene-edited babies A CRISPR spin-off causes unintended typos in DNA News of the first gene-edited babies ignited a firestorm The researcher who created CRISPR twins defends...