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Are blood donor sex, pregnancy history and death of transfusion recipients associated?

June 11, 2019

Bottom Line: Whether blood donors' sex and pregnancy history were associated with death for red blood cell transfusion recipients was investigated in this study that analyzed data from three study groups totaling more than 1 million transfusion recipients. There were no statistically significant associations between any of the three donor characteristics studied (female donors, previously pregnant donors, and donors and recipients who were of opposite sex) with in-hospital mortality of transfusion recipients in any of the three study groups. Prior research has produced conflicting results about possible associations between red blood cells from female donors and increased risk of death for transfusion recipients. The study has several limitations, including its observational design which can only show associations.

Authors: Gustaf Edgren, M.D., Ph.D., Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, and coauthors

(doi:10.1001/jama.2019.7084)

Editor's Note: The article contains conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.
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JAMA

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