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USPSTF recommendation on screening for HIV infection

June 11, 2019

Bottom Line: The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening for HIV infection in adolescents and adults ages 15 to 65; in those younger or older at increased risk of infection; and in all pregnant people. The USPSTF routinely makes recommendations about the effectiveness of preventive care services and this statement is an update of its 2013 recommendation. About 15% of people living with HIV are unaware of their infection, and it is estimated that those individuals are responsible for 40% of HIV transmissions in the United States. There were about 38,000 new cases of HIV infection in 2017.

(doi:10.1001/jama.2019.6587)

Editor's Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

Note: More information about the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, its process, and its recommendations can be found on the newsroom page of its website.
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Embed this link to provide your readers free access to the full-text article: This link will be live at the embargo time and all USPSTF articles remain free indefinitely: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2735345?guestAccessKey=bbd459cf-657e-4928-bacc-b01f1bdbe7ea&utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=061119

JAMA

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