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More men undergo plastic surgery as the daddy-do-over trend rises in popularity

June 12, 2019

Just as women can turn to a suite of procedures, known as the "Mommy Makeover," more men are embracing their own set of treatments, the "Daddy Do-Over," to boost their confidence and improve their physical appearance. A new report from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons reveals that more than 1.3 million cosmetic procedures were performed on men last year alone, representing a 29 percent increase since 2000.

Similar to a Mommy Makeover, the "Daddy-Do-Over" consists of surgical and non-surgical body contouring and facial procedures that are typically performed in a single surgery. Due to this rising trend, plastic surgery is becoming a common Father's Day request as more men consider a surgical assist to enhance their physique and fend off the "dad bod" for a while longer.

"Obviously, men don't go through the same physical changes that women experience during pregnancy and post-pregnancy, but their lifestyle does change, which can impact their appearance," said Alan Matarasso, MD, president of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. "Diet and exercise patterns fluctuate, and they don't sleep as much. Men notice their body changes due to aging and parenting, and it starts to look completely different in their 30s and 40s. That is the point of a Daddy-Do-Over."

After struggling to lose stubborn fat around his mid-section through dieting, 57-year-old Scott, a restaurateur in New York City, pursued plastic surgery when diet and exercise couldn't help him reach his goals.

"I realized I was never going to lose the weight on my own," he said. "Plastic surgery is a personal decision, but I know guys my age who have done different cosmetic procedures. I think an open dialogue about plastic surgery is becoming more acceptable, especially for men."

With more than 200,000 surgical procedures performed on men in 2018, rhinoplasty was the most popular with more than 52,000 procedures. Eyelid surgery ranked second, followed by liposuction (up 5 percent). Breast reduction (gynecomastia) ranked number four with more than 24,000 procedures, up 22 percent since 2000, and hair transplantation ranked fifth, up 17 percent since 2017.

Dr. Matarasso says he finds more men are seeking plastic surgery to help them professionally as well as they feel more confident about advancing in their careers and competing in the workplace after surgery.

Despite his lean physique, Dennis, 59, a creative director in New York City, also found it challenging to lose weight in specific areas. With a desire for a natural outcome, he underwent chin surgery and buccal fat removal surgery, as well as an eye lift to achieve a more youthful, toned appearance.

"I've been in fashion my entire career, and it makes me feel good when I walk in the room and I don't feel as if I look 60 in a room of 25- to-30-year-olds," said Dennis. "I always carried weight in my neck and chin, and my droopy eyelids made me look more tired than I actually was. I've gained unexpected confidence from the small changes I took."

Nearly half a million Botox procedures were performed on men last year, and more than 100,000 men had filler injections to reduce the signs of aging. Dr. Matarasso says male patients today embrace nonsurgical and minimally-invasive procedures to the same degree as female patients.

"Men are embracing the idea of surgery more than before," he added. "Regardless of the reason though, I always stress the importance of consulting with a member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. Our unique training and qualifications allow us to perform cosmetic procedures of all types. We are committed to providing plastic surgery patients with the safest outcomes, and we want them to have peace of mind as we help them achieve their aesthetic goals."
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About ASPS

The American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) is the world's largest organization of board-certified plastic surgeons. Representing more than 8,000 members, the Society is a leading authority on aesthetic and reconstructive plastic surgery. ASPS advances quality care to patients by encouraging high standards of training, ethics, physician practice and research in plastic surgery.

American Society of Plastic Surgeons

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