Nav: Home

The 'AI turn' for digital health: A futuristic view

June 12, 2019

New Rochelle, NY, June 12, 2019-- The unprecedented implications of digital health innovations, being co-produced by the mainstreaming and integration of artificial intelligence (AI), the Internet of Things (IoT), and cyber-physical systems (CPS) in healthcare, are examined in a new technology horizon-scanning article. This digital transformation of healthcare is facilitated by the rapid rise in Big Data and real-time Big Data analytics. The detailed findings are published in OMICS: A Journal of Integrative Biology, the peer-reviewed interdisciplinary journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. Click here to read the full-text article free on the OMICS: A Journal of Integrative Biology website until July 12, 2019.

Vural Özdemir, MD, PhD, DABCP, Editor-in-Chief of OMICS: A Journal of Integrative Biology is the author of the article entitled "The Big Picture on the 'AI Turn' for Digital Health: The Internet of Things and Cyber-Physical Systems." He explores the current applications of AI to life sciences and digital health, for example, in interpreting the massive amounts of data generated by genomics and other omics applications. Dr. Özdemir describes the IoT and provides digital health-related examples of CPS, such as wearables for cardiac monitoring and healthcare robots.

"Digital data are highly fluid and can rapidly move across spaces and places whereas the physical data and humans are much slower and exist in different scales than our digital footprints," says Vural Özdemir. "It is therefore timely for the system sciences and integrative biology communities to critically engage with digital health and the related technologies such as AI, IoT and CPS."
-end-
About the Journal

OMICS: A Journal of Integrative Biology is an authoritative and highly innovative peer-reviewed interdisciplinary journal published monthly online, addressing the latest advances at the intersection of postgenomics medicine, biotechnology and global society, including the integration of multi-omics knowledge, data analyses and modeling, and applications of high-throughput approaches to study complex biological and societal problems. Public policy, governance and societal aspects of the large-scale biology and 21st century data-enabled sciences are also peer-reviewed. Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the OMICS: A Journal of Integrative Biology website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many areas of science and biomedical research, including Journal of Computational Biology, ASSAY and Drug Development Technologies, and Zebrafish. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Related Healthcare Articles:

Mitochondrial disease has a disproportionate healthcare burden in US
Mitochondrial diseases are a diverse group of disorders caused by mutated genes that impair energy production in a patient's cells, often with severe effects.
Healthcare providers should individualize patient education
Health information should be tailored to a patient's ability to understand health concepts and keep them motivated to maintain long-term changes.
High prevalence of CRE in Washington, D.C. healthcare facilities
Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), a family of highly pathogenic antibiotic-resistant organisms, are endemic across Washington, D.C. healthcare facilities, with 5.2 percent of inpatients testing positive for the bacteria, according to new research published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.
Better, cheaper healthcare with dry blood samples
A drop of blood on filter paper, allowed to dry and stored for future diagnostic purposes -- considerably easier than the present-day, resource-consuming method using frozen blood samples in plastic tubes.
Undetected Ebola infection in international healthcare workers very unlikely
Undiagnosed Ebola virus infection was probably very rare in international workers who were deployed during the 2013-2015 outbreak of the virus in West Africa, despite mild and asymptomatic cases of Ebola being known to occur, according to new research led by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.
More Healthcare News and Healthcare Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans
More than test scores or good grades — what do kids need to prepare them for the future? This hour, guest host Manoush Zomorodi and TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, in and out of the classroom. Guests include educators Olympia Della Flora and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#535 Superior
Apologies for the delay getting this week's episode out! A technical glitch slowed us down, but all is once again well. This week, we look at the often troubling intertwining of science and race: its long history, its ability to persist even during periods of disrepute, and the current forms it takes as it resurfaces, leveraging the internet and nationalism to buoy itself. We speak with Angela Saini, independent journalist and author of the new book "Superior: The Return of Race Science", about where race science went and how it's coming back.