Successful Specialist Care For Cystic Fibrosis Patients From Childhood To Adulthood

June 12, 1998

(Clinical outcome in relation to care in centres specialising in cystic fibrosis: cross sectional study)

The longer-term prognosis of patients with cystic fibrosis can be improved if patients are treated at both paediatric and adult cystic fibrosis centres. Therefore it is the clinical responsibility of all physicians to ensure that specialist care begins in childhood and is continued throughout adult life, says Dr Ravi Mahadeva et al in their study, published in this week's BMJ.

Based on resaerch conducted at two adult cystic fibrosis centres in Manchester and Cambridge, the authors conclude that even though previous studies have supported a clinical benefit from specialist teams providing care in cystic fibrosis centres, their study provides good evidence to justify the system.

Contact:

Dr Diana Bilton, Consultant Physician, Cystic Fibrosis Unit, Papworth Hospital NHS Trust, Papworth Everard, Cambridge
Press Office: Kate Lancaster
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BMJ

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