MARC travel awards announced for the AAI 2011 Advanced Course in Immunology

June 13, 2011

Bethesda, MD - FASEB MARC (Minority Access to Research Careers) Program has announced the travel award recipients for The American Association of Immunologists (AAI) Advanced Course in Immunology at The University of Minnesota in Minneapolis from July 31 - August 5, 2011. These awards are meant to promote the entry of underrepresented minority students, postdoctorates and scientists into the mainstream of the basic science community and to encourage the participation of young scientists at the AAI 2011 Advanced Course in Immunology. This year MARC conferred 6 awards totaling $9,900.

The FASEB MARC Program is funded by a grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health. A primary goal of the MARC Program is to increase the number and competitiveness of underrepresented minorities engaged in biomedical and behavioral research.

The following course participants have been selected to receive FASEB MARC Travel Awards:

Dr. Denise E. De Almeida, University of Michigan [AAI member]
Dailia B. Francis, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York [AAI member]
Pedro A. Martinez, Iowa State University [AAI member]
Jodi Murakami, Irell & Manella Graduate School of Biological Sciences at City of Hope [AAI member]
Frances Valencia, University of Texas Medical Branch [AAI member]
Leticia Watkins, University of Alabama at Birmingham
-end-
FASEB is composed of 24 societies with more than 100,000 members, making it the largest coalition of biomedical research associations in the United States. FASEB enhances the ability of scientists and engineers to improve--through their research--the health, well-being and productivity of all people. Our mission is to advance health and welfare by promoting progress and education in biological and biomedical sciences through service to its member societies and collaborative advocacy.

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

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