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Leading STEM publisher sees significant growth in journal impact factors

June 13, 2016

New Rochelle, NY, June 13, 2016--Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers announces significant growth in the impact factors of its peer-reviewed journals, as reported in the new 2015 Journal Citation Reports® (Thomson Reuters, 2016).

More than 60% of the Publisher's portfolio of previously indexed journals received increased impact factors, with 17 titles seeing double-digit percentage increases. Of particular note are the increases and continued impact of Journal of Neurotrauma with an 18% increase, Journal of Endourology with a 23% increase, DNA and Cell Biology with a 25% increase, and Environmental Engineering Science with a 49% increase.

Seven journals received first impact factors this year, including Soft Robotics with a groundbreaking first impact factor of 6.130 and LGBT Health with a first impact factor of 2.261.

Flagship publications Human Gene Therapy, Tissue Engineering, and Stem Cells and Development maintained strong impact factors and reinforced their positions as leaders in their respective fields.

"We are pleased to see such excellent progress in the impact factors of our journals this year," says Vicki Cohn, Executive Vice President and Managing Editor. "It is a tribute to the achievements and contributions of our authors, editors, editorial boards, and reviewers, and an indication of our publications' continued significance to the scientific community."
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About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company universally acknowledged for publishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in the most promising areas of biomedical research, biotechnology and regenerative medicine, clinical medicine, public health, law, environmental studies, and technology and engineering. The company's publications make critical contributions in advancing research and facilitating collaboration throughout the world in academia, industry, and government, and are also highly respected resources for legislators, policymakers, and educators. A complete list of the firm's journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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